Corn

Also see: Corn
Figure 1. Based corn stalk residue.
Figure 1. Where moisture is not limited, research shows that removing some corn residue from a field may benefit yield in the following crop. However, if residue is removed for more than three years, research showed longer term impacts to the soil.

Crop Residue Removal: Impacts on Yield December 8, 2017

A review of multiple research studies indicates that where moisture is not limited, residue removal can result in no yield reduction to yield increases for the subsequent crop. However, long-term residue removal has been shown to affect other production factors and it's recommended that even in minimal erosion areas, removing residue does impact other production factors and it's recommended that 2.4 tons/acre of residue be left in the field.

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Figure 1. Corn stalk residue with downed ears, baled and ready to use. (Photo by Jenny Rees)
Figure 1. Corn stalk residue with downed ears baled and ready to use. (Photo by Jenny Rees)

Corn Stover Removal: Nutrient Value of Stover and Impacts on Soil Properties December 7, 2017

Corn residue has a number of uses and thus its value as well as its impact on other systems may need to be estimated when evaluating post-harvest options. This article looks at how to estimate the nutrient value of the residue and potential impacts to the soil from removing the residue, based on Nebraska research.

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Amelioration Strategies after Corn Residue Removal December 7, 2017

The authors review three research studies on how amelioration practices such as adding cover crops and/or manure may offset any effects of removing crop residue.

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Taking the corn stalk nitrate test in the field
(From left) Rodrigo Werle, assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture; Jacob Nickel, irrigation research technician; and Himmy Lo, research assistant in biological systems engineering, perform stalk nitrate sampling on a plot at the West Central Research and Extension Center in North Platte. (Daran Rudnick/Biological Systems Engineering)

Competition Encourages Ag Producers to Try New Technologies, Methods December 6, 2017

A new University of Nebraska-Lincoln-led partnership is helping agricultural producers explore emerging technologies and identify ways to strengthen profitability without increasing risk during the growing season.

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Corn Harvest Nears Completion; Wheat Condition Good November 20, 2017

Corn harvest was 93% complete as of Sunday and near the five-year average of 95%, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service report for the week ending November 19.

Temperatures averaged near normal across eastern Nebraska, but six to ten degrees above normal in the west. Precipitation was limited, allowing good conditions for harvest.

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A scene in Sub-Saharan Africa
Figure 1. Sub-Saharan Africa is unlikely to become the world's next breadbasket, according to a new University of Nebraska-Lincoln study. (Source: Shutterstock.com)

Could Sub-Saharan Africa be the World's Next Breadbasket? Nebraska Study Says It's Unlikely November 17, 2017

While there is huge potential for sub-Saharan Africa to increase agricultural productivity, the odds that the region will become the world's next breadbasket are low, according to a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. While the area receives more rain than the world's other breadbaskets, its shallower and "older" soils may not serve as good water reservoirs during periods of little rainfall.

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Market Journal Looks at Market Response to USDA Crop Report November 17, 2017

This week's Market Journal looks at how to select for Bt traits to protect corn from insects, the corn and soybean markets, how La Niña could impact weather conditions in the US and South America, and this week's forecast.

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Corn being harvested

Corn Harvest Makes Good Progress in Last Week, Now Near Average November 13, 2017

With mostly dry conditions Nebraska's corn harvest made good progress in the last week and was estimated to be 86% complete, up considerably from the 68% reported last week and near the five-year average of 90%. Last year 92% had been harvested at this point in the season.

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