photo of dignitaries visiting panhandle for dry bean harvest

Nebraska Dry Bean Commission Hosts Field Tour for U.S. Agriculture Trade

September 10, 2020
The Nebraska Dry Bean Commission hosted a field tour for Ambassador Gregg Doud, Chief Agricultural Negotiator in the Office of the United States Trade Representative on Sept. 2nd and 3rd in the Nebraska Panhandle.

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palmer amaranth research plot

How to Control Palmer Amaranth in Dry Beans in Nebraska

September 10, 2020
Palmer amaranth emergence occurs throughout the season, generally from early May to late August. Consequently, weed control programs targeting Palmer amaranth need to provide season-long control, or from planting through canopy closure.

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Integrated Weed Management Specialist Nevin Lawrence speaks in front of a weed control plot
During a research plot tour at the 2019 Panhandle Agricultural Research and Technology Tour (PARTT), Integrated Weed Management Specialist Nevin Lawrence speaks in front of a weed control plot.

Panhandle Center to Host Field Day Aug. 20

July 22, 2020
The University of Nebraska Panhandle Research and Extension Center will partner with the Nebraska Dry Bean Growers Association on August 20 to host the annual Panhandle Agricultural Research and Technology Tour (PARTT). The in-person event will be conducted with social distancing and other precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

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Carlos Urrea, dry bean breeding specialist at the Panhandle Research and Extension Center in Scottsbluff (center, in red shirt), stands in a hail-damaged dry bean variety plot at the Panhandle Center, during the annual Panhandle Ag Research and Technology Tour (PARTT) in August 2019.
Carlos Urrea, dry bean breeding specialist at the Panhandle Research and Extension Center in Scottsbluff (center, in red shirt), stands in a hail-damaged dry bean variety plot at the Panhandle Center, during the annual Panhandle Ag Research and Technology Tour (PARTT) in August 2019.

2019 Nebraska Dry Edible Bean Trial Results

December 16, 2019
Results of the 2019 variety trials for dry edible beans conducted by the University of Nebraska Panhandle Research and Extension Center have been posted on the Nebraska Extension CropWatch website.

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A comparison of the bacteria that cause bacterial wilt of dry beans and Goss’ wilt of corn. The rods of Curtobacterium (left) in the dry bean wilt pathogen are shorter and fatter than the Goss’ wilt pathogen, Clavibacter (right).
Figure 1. A comparison of the bacteria that cause bacterial wilt of dry beans and Goss’ wilt of corn. The rods of Curtobacterium (left) in the dry bean wilt pathogen are shorter and fatter than the Goss’ wilt pathogen, Clavibacter (right).

Puzzling Out Two Closely Related Corn, Dry Bean Diseases

October 24, 2019
Two closely related plant diseases — one in corn and the other in dry bean — have followed similar, but somewhat perplexing patterns of appearing, disappearing, and then resurging as a serious threat to crop yield. A UNL researcher looks at factors affecting the cycle and whether it can be predicted.

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USDA Funds 13 Specialty Crop Projects in Nebraska

October 8, 2019
From dry beans to honey, specialty crops are an important part of Nebraska agriculture. This week USDA awarded nearly $675,000 for projects designed to strengthen the specialty crop industry in Nebraska.

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Dry bean harvest underway in the Nebraska Panhandle

Dry Bean Harvest in the Nebraska Panhandle

September 26, 2019
Dry bean harvest is well underway in the North Platte River Valley where yields are down in areas that faced significant challenges this summer, as well as areas with sufficient water and no hail.

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Dry edible beans being cooked to test various variety attributes, including cooking time

When Developing New Lines of Dry Edible Beans, Cooking Time Matters Too

March 8, 2019
When breeding new lines of dry edible beans, disease resistance, drought tolerance, and plant architecture can be observed in the field, but measuring cooking time is a chore for the laboratory. Cooks prefer varieties that cook in 30-45 minutes.

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