Soil Conservation

Chart of residue required for different slopes

Crop Residue and High-Carbon Char: Potential Soil Conservation Tools May 8, 2018

Soil is the single most important resource on which our agriculture depends. Proper soil management is necessary to sustain long-term agricultural productivity. Soil loss through erosion or run-off hurts agricultural production with depletion of organic matter and fertility. It also has environmental implications.

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Figure 1. Rye cover crop termination date and corn residue removal study at Rogers Memorial Farm near Lincoln.
Figure 1. Rye cover crop termination date and corn residue removal study at Rogers Memorial Farm near Lincoln.

Can a Rye Cover Crop Reduce Wind Erosion from Fields with Little Residue Cover? February 12, 2018

Researchers examined the effect of a rye cover crop on reducing soil erosion from wind in fields where a large amount of the crop residue had been removed.

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Photo of soybean and switchgrass barriers side by side.

Switchgrass Barriers as a Soil Water Conservation Practice February 7, 2018

Research was conducted to compare infiltration rates in switchgrass barriers and a soybean field. Results showed the value of grass barriers in improving soil structure and infiltration and reducing runoff of sediments and nutrients.

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Ephermeral gully in a corn field.
Field 1. Research indicates that when used in combination with other measures, manure can play a valuable role in increasing soil aggregate size and reducing soil erosion such as from the ephermeral gully in this corn field.

Using Manure as an Aid in Reducing Erosion and Runoff August 3, 2017

By improving soil properties manure applications can help increase water infiltration and reduce soil erosion when used in combination with other soil conservation practices. Care needs to be taken, however, in how often and how much manure is applied to avoid P loss in runoff and erosion.

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filter and buffer strips next to waterway
Figure 1. Grassed filter strips and grass and woody buffer strips are a common sense means for reducing sediment and agrichemicals in field runoff. Funding is available from the Nebraska Department of Agriculture to use these measures. (Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS)

NDA Funding Available for Buffer Strips January 23, 2017

Buffer strips are a common sense approach to reducing agrichemicals and soil sediment in field runoff and may be funded through a program of the Nebraska Department of Agriculture.

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