Grasshoppers

Silage pit on farm covered with tires
Once silage is exposed to oxygen, its quality can decrease quickly. For best results, don’t expose more than three days’ worth of a pile at a time.

Pasture and Forage Minute: Retaining Silage Quality During Feedout, Grasshopper Management

May 21, 2024
Tips on retaining silage condition during feedout, planning the optimal time for grass hay harvest, and controlling grasshopper in rangeland and forages.

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Grasshopper in field
With continued drought, producers may see grasshoppers moving from field edges into crops. Frequent scouting of fields will be critical in the coming weeks, particularly in alfalfa and late summer-seeded grasses, which are more susceptible to feeding damage..

Pasture and Forage Minute: Managing Grasshoppers, Pasture Weeds and Wet Hay

August 23, 2023
Insights on late summer grasshopper and pasture weed control, and options for producers putting up hay in wet conditions.

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Grasshopper in meadow
Grasshoppers tend to thrive in dry, hot conditions while outbreaks can be severely limited by cool, wet spring weather, and as such, producers in eastern Nebraska might see an increase in outbreaks this summer, while western Nebraska grasshopper populations may be reduced.

Pasture and Forage Minute: Grasshopper Control, Sub-irrigated Meadow Hay Harvest

July 7, 2023
Extension insights on grazing strategies to accommodate weather changes, grasshopper scouting and treatment recommendations, and tips for getting the most out of sub-irrigated meadow hay harvest in Nebraska. 

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Grasshopper in field
Prolonged and extreme drought conditions have increased the potential for problematic grasshopper populations this growing season. Producers seeking information about grasshopper control can contact their local extension educator for more assistance. (Photo by Troy Walz)

Pasture Grasshopper Management

June 8, 2023
Prolonged drought conditions have increased the potential for problematic grasshopper populations this growing season, particularly for counties in the western two-thirds of Nebraska.

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Grasshopper
Though central and western Nebraska a have a higher risk for grasshopper outbreaks this season, a cool, wet spring would mitigate population growth not only for this growing season, but also the following year.

Pasture and Forage Minute: Alfalfa Seed Selection, Grasshoppers After Drought

April 5, 2023
This week — Reviewing seed selection to avoid anthracnose and Phytophthora root rot, assessing alfalfa stands and predictions on grasshopper populations following the 2022 drought.

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Droughty soybeans
Grazing and ensiling may be the easiest ways for growers to handle drought-stressed soybeans this year.

Pasture and Forage Minute: Salvaging Drought-stressed Soybeans as Forages, Grasshopper Control

August 30, 2022
Nebraska Extension educators review forage considerations for growers faced with droughty soybeans, tips on measuring stands and assessing alfalfa field health, and thresholds where grasshopper control may be warranted.

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Grasshopper in pasture
With grasshopper populations flourishing in dry conditions statewide, the reduced agent/area treatment can be an effective control technique for pastures and rangeland.

Pasture and Forage Minute: Harvesting Drought-stressed Corn and Milo, Controlling Grasshoppers

August 2, 2022
Considerations for harvesting drought-stressed corn or milo, grasshopper control in pastures and rangeland, and taking inventory of fall/winter feed and hay.

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Grasshopper
With conditions remaining dry this summer, if the grasshopper population in an established field is higher than five hoppers per square yard throughout the field or 15 hoppers per square yard in field margins, insecticides should be considered.

Pasture and Forage Minute: Grasshopper Control, Safe Grazing Guidelines And Blue-green Algae Poisoning

July 13, 2022
Tips for effective control of grasshoppers in alfalfa, prussic acid poisoning from summer annual forages and blue-green algae in livestock water.

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