Corn

Also see: Corn
Freeze damage to corn seedlings
Figure 1. (left) Yellow corn displaying damage from last week’s frost. Eighty to ninety percent of plants in this area of the field will likely recover, thus replanting would not be justified. Figure 2. Plant displaying frost injury. Both in Lancaster County, May 4, 2017. (Photos by Roger Elmore)

Do I Need to Replant My Corn? May 5, 2017

Considering whether your corn should be replanted? The authors look at types of plant damage at early growth stages and the effect on potential yield. It includes a table of relative yield potential of corn by planting date and population.

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Crop Progress as of 4/30/17

USDA NASS: Corn Planting at 34%, Soybean at 8% May 1, 2017

Despite rainy cold conditions that moved in mid week, corn planting moved to 34% complete as of Sunday April 30, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Services weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report. Eight percent of the soybean crop had been planted. For the week ending April 30, temperatures averaged eight to ten degrees below normal, according to the report. Significant rainfall of one inch or more was recorded across most counties. Moderate snow, averaging two to four inches, was recorded in south central and northeastern counties at the end of the week.

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Frost-damaged corn
Figure 1. Buggy-whipping, shown hear in the two plants on the left, is when dead leaf tissue traps new leaf tissue, is one symptom of frost-damaged early season corn. (Archive photo by Roger Elmore)

Risk of Freeze Damage in Early-Planted, Emerged Corn April 28, 2017

Early-season freeze damage results in a range of potential yield impacts. Severe damage is often limited to low-lying areas within a field because cool air is heavier than warm air. Early season survival of corn plants is attributed to growing-point protection below the soil surface; however, a hard frost can penetrate the ground and kill plants. Regrowth of corn following freeze damage is often impeded by dead leaf tissue that can entrap new leaves.

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Nebraska Soybean and Corn Field Guide Cover

New Pocket Field Guide for Nebraska Soybean and Corn Growers April 28, 2017

Nebraska farmers now have a new field resource to aid in identifying plant and pest problems in their soybean and corn fields. The Nebraska Soybean and Corn Pocket Field Guide provides information and photos to help farmers identify problems they may encounter during the growing season. The 380-page pocket-sized production guide was produced by a team of University of Nebraska researchers and Extension faculty, and funded by the Nebraska Soybean Board (NSB), Nebraska Corn Board (NCB), and the United Soybean Board (USB). Editors were Jim Specht, soybean physiologist/geneticist and University of Nebraska professor emeritus, and Tom Hoegemeyer, corn breeder and UNL adjunct professor of practice.

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Table of USDA NASS Crop Progress for Nebraska

Above Normal Temps Lead to Jump in Corn Planting Progress April 25, 2017

With temperatures averaging two to four degrees above normal for the week ending April 23, corn planting was well underway and soybean planting had started in Nebraska, according to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service.

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Meat thermometer measuring soil temperature

Corn, Soybean Planting Considerations for this Week’s Cold Snap April 24, 2017

With nighttime lows predicted to drop several nights this week, growers are advised to cautiously assess the potential for germination problems due to imbibitional chilling before planting. Agronomists advise checking soil temperatures in each field the day of planting as well as forecast temperatures for 24 hours (soybeans) or 48 hours (corn) after planting.

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Field of soybeans
Figure 1. If a fomesafen-based herbicide (Flexstar/ Flexstar GT/ Marvel/Rumble) was applied in soybean in 2016, maintain 10 months of planting interval to corn this year.

Planting Interval of Corn after Previous Year's Soybean Herbicides April 21, 2017

Corn-soybean is the most common cropping system in eastern Nebraska. While corn growers are getting ready for planting this season, it is important to pay attention to the planting interval of herbicides applied the previous year in soybean. Certain soybean herbicides have relatively longer planting intervals for corn, especially if they are applied post-emergence in soybean. This is particularly important because soybean planting was late last year in much of Nebraska due to May rains. This caused postemergence herbicides to be applied later in the season than they might normally be, making it important that you pay attention to the planting interval.

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Figure 1. Liquid fertilizer manifold used on a planter for applying starter fertilizer. (Photo by Charles Shapiro)

Starter Fertilizer: When is it Warranted? April 12, 2017

As you evaluate the cost of inputs, consider this: Only focusing on expenses without subsequent income changes is misleading. The most profitable plan uses the most profitable inputs. Is a starter fertilizer one of those inputs? The authors look at university and grower research under various conditions to see when a starter fertilizer offers economic benefits.

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