Corn

Also see: Corn
Flooded field in south central Nebraska
Multiple rains are leading to flooded field areas in southern Nebraska. (Photo by Jenny Rees)

Corn Survival in Ponded or Flooded Fields May 19, 2017

Heavy rains of 2 to more than 4 inches in south central Nebraska May 15-19 have led to ponding or flooding in many fields. Survival of young corn plants under these conditions depends on several factors, described here.

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cross-banded corn
Figure 1. Note the creases on second leaf of the two plants on the right. Perhaps these are the remnant effects of cross banding noted from this same field on May 9. (SCAL, May 16, 2017. Photos by Roger Elmore)

Cross-Banding on Corn Leaves: One Week Later May 17, 2017

A gallery of photos showing decreased effect of yellow cross-banding in corn leaves in south central Nebraska one week after initial report in CropWatch. This effect was due to pre-emergent cold temperatures and is not expected to affect yield.

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Corn seedlings exhibiting "yellow banding"
Figure 1. "Cross-banding" on emerged corn at SCAL planted on April 17, 2017. Leaves were encased in the coleoptile below ground during the extreme dip in air and soil temperatures. Emergence occurred between May 5 and 10 and was about 50% May 10. Expect plant-to-plant variation in emergence, growth, and development with early-planted corn. (SCAL, May 10, 2017. Photos by Roger Elmore)

‘Cross-Banding’ on Corn Leaves Due to Pre-Emergent, Cold Soil Temperatures May 12, 2017

Early-planted corn at the university's South Central Ag Lab was not emerged during the late-April cold snap, but upon emergence displayed symptoms of “cross-banding”: yellow to pale green, horizontal bands ― perpendicular to the leaf midribs. These often appear in a similar position on other seedlings and at about the same height above ground on different leaves.

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Wireworms

Scout Emerging Corn for Early Season Insects May 11, 2017

As corn begins to emerge, be alert to the potential for damage from early season insects such as cutworms, wireworms, or white grubs. Wireworms and white grubs are most often associated with fields that have been in pasture or CRP where the grasses were allowed to grow for more than one year. It is rare to see these problems in continuous corn, but exceptions happen. Since wireworms and white grubs feed underground and cutworms feed on or below the soil surface, scout for plant damage and then dig in soil around the plant to identify the insect causing the damage.

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Yield Chart for 2016 Corn Yield Forecasts

Hindsight of 2016 Corn Yield Forecasts by the Yield Forecasting Center May 11, 2017

Here we provide an evaluation of the corn yield forecasts released during the 2016 crop season by the Yield Forecast Center. We compared our end-of-season forecasted yield potential against the average corn yields reported by USDA NASS for rainfed and irrigated production.

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Corn seedling damage
Figure 1. Seedling with post-emergence damping off (left) next to a healthy seedling.

Recent Cold, Wet Conditions are Favorable for Seedling Diseases in Early Planted Corn May 5, 2017

Recent cold, wet field conditions and fluctuations in soil temperatures have put early planted corn at risk for seedling disease development. Cold soil temperatures and episodes of recent rainfall (and snow) are especially favorable for some of the most common and damaging seedling diseases favored by cold wet conditions.

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Freeze damage to corn seedlings
Figure 1. (left) Yellow corn displaying damage from last week’s frost. Eighty to ninety percent of plants in this area of the field will likely recover, thus replanting would not be justified. Figure 2. Plant displaying frost injury. Both in Lancaster County, May 4, 2017. (Photos by Roger Elmore)

Do I Need to Replant My Corn? May 5, 2017

Considering whether your corn should be replanted? The authors look at types of plant damage at early growth stages and the effect on potential yield. It includes a table of relative yield potential of corn by planting date and population.

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Crop Progress as of 4/30/17

USDA NASS: Corn Planting at 34%, Soybean at 8% May 1, 2017

Despite rainy cold conditions that moved in mid week, corn planting moved to 34% complete as of Sunday April 30, according to the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Services weekly Crop Progress and Condition Report. Eight percent of the soybean crop had been planted. For the week ending April 30, temperatures averaged eight to ten degrees below normal, according to the report. Significant rainfall of one inch or more was recorded across most counties. Moderate snow, averaging two to four inches, was recorded in south central and northeastern counties at the end of the week.

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