Research Updates

Chart showing tiller numbers of two varieties of indiangrass

Does Seeding Rate Affect Establishment-Year Growth and Long-term Forage Yield of Indiangrass? February 5, 2018

Recent improvements in forage yield and nutritive value of indiangrass, along with its wide range of adaptation should increase its use in bioenergy and forage production, conservation practices, and reclamation projects in the central Great Plains. This study tested five seeding rates with two varieties — 'Oto' and 'NE 54' — and the effects on dry matter production

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Graph of stand frequency for two indiangrass varieties

Does Weed Control Method Impact Indiangrass Establishment and Persistence? February 5, 2018

This study evaluated two weed control methods and seeding rates on establishment and persistence of two indiangrass cultivars, ‘Oto’ and ‘NE 54’, from 2003 to 2007.

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Figure 1. Extension Educator Gary Lesoing examines harvest data at one of the many on-farm research trials being conducted across the state. (Photo by Laura Thompson)
Figure 1. Extension Educator Gary Lesoing examines harvest data at one of the many on-farm research trials being conducted across the state. (Photo by Laura Thompson)

Growers Statewide to Share On-Farm Research Results January 26, 2018

Farm operators and agronomists from across the state are invited to hear about results from over 80 on-farm research projects at the Nebraska On-Farm Research Network update meetings this February. Projects cover products, practices, and new technologies that impact farm productivity and profitability.

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Mixture of chopped sugarbeets and wheat

University Studies Sugarbeets as a Livestock Feed for Weaned Calves November 17, 2017

In the third year of its research on using chopped sugarbeets for livestock feed, university researchers are moving from using pregnant cows to weaned calves as their research subjects. Growing and finishing trials will be conducted with calves both receiving and not receiving sugarbeets as an energy source.

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A scene in Sub-Saharan Africa
Figure 1. Sub-Saharan Africa is unlikely to become the world's next breadbasket, according to a new University of Nebraska-Lincoln study. (Source: Shutterstock.com)

Could Sub-Saharan Africa be the World's Next Breadbasket? Nebraska Study Says It's Unlikely November 17, 2017

While there is huge potential for sub-Saharan Africa to increase agricultural productivity, the odds that the region will become the world's next breadbasket are low, according to a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. While the area receives more rain than the world's other breadbaskets, its shallower and "older" soils may not serve as good water reservoirs during periods of little rainfall.

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Perceptions of Crop Consultants and Crop Producers on Grazing Corn Residue in Nebraska October 19, 2017

A new journal article by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers reports on the results of a survey asking consultants and growers about what factors influence their thinking on grazing crop residue. The report notes that while corn residue grazing is a longstanding practice in the state, currently only about 25% of the state's corn residue is being grazed.

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Figure 1. Field peas are mature and ready to harvest in this variety trial plot near Grant.
Figure 1. Field peas are mature and ready to harvest in this variety trial plot near Grant. (Photos by David Ostdiek)

2017 Field Pea Variety Trial Results October 19, 2017

The 2017 university field pea variety trials have been posted to CropWatch and include results from seven plots with up to 25 varieties at each location. The varieties are grouped in three categories: older, robust lines; newer, higher yielding lines just coming to market; and new lines in development.

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Unmanned Aircraft Research Team: (left to right) Joe Luck, Christopher Neale, Wayne Woldt, George Meyer, Derek Hereen, Yufeng Ge, (inset) Eric Frew

Drones Buzzing Toward Increased Crop Production October 18, 2017

A new research project funded by a $500,000 USDA grant and support from the University's Daugherty Water for Food Global Institute seeks to deploy unmanned aircraft (drones) in search of improved crop irrigation efficiency. The project will conduct regular drone flights throughout the season, using advanced remote sensing systems and in-field sensors to collect data.

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