Research Updates

KU researchers conducting water tests in the field

Kansas University Research: ‘Weather Whiplash’ Triggered by Changing Climate will Degrade Midwest’s Drinking Water

April 3, 2017
One consequence of global climate change is the likelihood of more extreme seesawing between drought and flood, a phenomenon dubbed “weather whiplash.” In a peer-reviewed study researchers at the University of Kansas discuss how weather whiplash in the American Midwest's agricultural regions may after water quality, forcing municipalities to seek costly remedies to provide safe drinking water to residents.

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Corn GDD chart

The U2U Corn Growing Degree Day Tool: Tracking Corn Growth Across the US Corn Belt

April 3, 2017
In a recent journal article authors discuss the Corn Growing Degree Day (Corn GDD) tool developed by Useful to Usable (U2U), one of several products that transform existing data into usable products for the agricultural community. The article, published in Climate Risk Management, explores the science behind the tool.

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Emerging New Technologies for Insect Pest Management

March 31, 2017

Ravdeep Mutti, with the Du-Pont Pioneer Research and Development Center in Johnston, Iowa, will present the seminar, “Emerging New Technologies for Insect Pest Management” on Tuesday, April 4, at 4 p.m. in the Nebraska East Union. Refreshments will be served.

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checking grain moisture

Device to Measure Grain Bag Moisture

March 20, 2017
USDA scientists have developed a new way to determine the moisture content of grain stored in bags. Together with Kansas State University colleagues, Paul Armstrong, an agricultural engineer with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in Manhattan, Kansas, developed a hand-held meter that measures the relative humidity and temperature of the air within the grain. A DIY build for approximately $75.

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Patricio Grassini and a field of corn
Patricio Grassini and a field of corn

UNL Corn Yield Model Verifies as Reliable Larger Scale Predictor

June 13, 2016
Collecting basic agricultural data from a mere 45 sites can provide enough predictive power to reasonably estimate crop yields within a 10-state swath of the U.S. Corn Belt, says a new study led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The study compared actual corn production from 2011 through 2014 against best-case projections from the UNL Hybrid-Maize model that accounts for weather, soil properties and planting practices.

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