Pest of the Month

Bacterial leaf streak in corn
Figure 1. Bacterial leaf streak symptoms on corn are interveinal streaks that may appear tan, brown, or especially yellow when backlit by the sun.

Bacterial Leaf Streak of Corn August 25, 2017

Bacterial leaf streak was just confirmed in Nebraska in 2016, the first incidence in the US, but has now spread to 56 counties and is found in eight other states.Learn about factors contributing to its development and "host" plants, as well as management options.

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Japanese beetle
Figure 1. Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) (Photo by Jim Kalisch)

Nebraska Extension Pest of the Month: Japanese Beetle February 1, 2017

Insects are a part of our environment. Most are beneficial, not problematic. In fact, only a small percentage — less than one percent of all insects — are considered pests. However, some pests can be very problematic because they are invasive insects that came here from another country and they came here without their natural predators.

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Horseweed plant stages
Figure 1. (Top left) Newly emerged horseweed seedlings in the cotyledon stage. (Bottom left) Seedling in the rosette stage with true leaves formed. (Right) Horseweed plants that are early in the bolting stage.

Nebraska Extension Pest of The Month: Horseweed January 5, 2017

Horseweed (marestail, Conyza canadensis L.) is a unique weed species that can emerge in both fall and spring. In Nebraska, unlike the eastern Corn Belt, horseweed populations predominantly emerge in fall as a winter annual.

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Figure 2. Cheatgrass seed heads (or panicles) as they mature. The panicles on the left are shattering, the second on the left is mature but not shattering, the two on the right are immature.
Figure 2. Cheatgrass seed heads (or panicles) as they mature. The panicles on the left are shattering, the second on the left is mature but not shattering, the two on the right are immature.

Nebraska Extension Pest of the Month: Cheatgrass October 17, 2016

The winter annual weed species cheatgrass is competitive with crops, desirable forage, and native plants and will reduce productivity of crop and range land. Learn how grazing, mowing, and properly timed herbicide application can be integrated to provide effective control.

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