Invasive Species

Common mullein
Figure 1. Stand of common mullein. (All photos by Gary Stone)

Common Mullein, an Invasive Weed on Nebraska’s Horizon June 4, 2018

Common mullein is an invasive weed threatening western Nebraska land use. Here's what you need to know to be on your guard as prevention and early control are the best and the cheapest management options.

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Figure 1. Sulphur cinquefoil flower (Photos by Gary Stone)
Figure 1. Sulphur cinquefoil flower (Photos by Gary Stone)

Sulphur Cinquefoil — An Invasive Species in Nebraska March 16, 2018

Sulphur cinquefoil is a perennial forb and aggressive invasive species that establishes quickly in disturbed areas and over-grazed sites. Prevention and, if necessary, timely identification and management are the best routes to containing this invader.

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Absinth wormwood leaf
Figure 1. Absinth wormwood leaf (Photo by Kristi Paul)

Absinth Wormwood - New Invasive Species in Nebraska Panhandle May 17, 2017

An invasive species, absinth wormwood will establish quickly in disturbed areas and over-grazed sites and can out-compete desirable forbs and grasses in pastures and rangeland, reducing biodiversity.

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Ventenata plants
Ventenata / North African Grass seed heads, Ventenata dubia (Leers) Coss. Photo credit: ©Prof Matt Lavin-2008/Bozeman, Montana, USA - CC BY-SA 2.0

Watching for Ventenata — an Invasive Weed on our Western Horizon April 5, 2017

Ventenata is an invasive grass in Wyoming that is slowly spreading east. If it does migrate to Nebraska, early detection and rapid response will be essential in controlling its establishment. If it were to become established in the Pine Ridge area or Sandhills, it could devastate the ecology and range production.

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Medusahead Grass
Figure 1. Medusahead seed head, Taeniatherum caput-medusae (L.) Nevski (Photo credit: Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org)

Detecting Invasive Species: Medusahead March 10, 2017

Growers are encourage to watch for Medusahead, an invasive weed species that is now in Wyoming and moving eastward. If it reaches the Pine Ridge area or Sandhills, it could cause devastating damage to the ecology and range production. The concept of early detection and rapid response, as described here, will be important to its containment.

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