Nathan Mueller - Extension Educator

Nathan Mueller

faculty
Work
PO Box 978 306 W 3rd St Wilber NE 68465-0978
US
Nathan serves as the Cropping Systems Extension Educator in Wilber, NE. After growing up on the family dairy farm northeast of Fremont, he earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in agronomy from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a PhD in agronomy from Kansas State University. His master’s degree focused on sediment and phosphorus movement in agricultural watersheds. His PhD research focused on soil fertility in corn and soybeans. Previous experience includes working for the Indiana State Department of Ag – Soil Conservation Division as a Resource Specialist Team Leader and assistant professor at SDSU serving as the state extension agronomist.

icon-academic-capEducation

  • Ph D, Kansas State University, 2012
  • MS, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2007
  • BS, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2005

icon-bookmark-starAwards & Honors

  • 2018 New Horizon Award, Nebraska Agribusiness Club, 2018
  • 2015 Water Cooperator of the Year, Lower Platte North Natural Resource District, 2015
Area: Saline, Jefferson and Gage Counties

Degrees and Certifications
B.S. Agronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2005
M.S. Agronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2007
Ph.D. Agronomy, Kansas State University, 2012
Certified Crop Adviser - NE #106079
Areas of Focus: Precision ag data management, on-farm research, soil fertility and plant nutrition, eastern Nebraska cropping systems
Twitter: @croptechcafe
Blog: Crop Tech Cafe

Nebraska sample field map

What Have We Learned about Soybean Seed Constituents in Irrigated and Dryland Producer Fields in Nebraska?

June 14, 2021
With a continuous decline in seed protein concentration in U.S. soybeans, UNL researchers examined how irrigation practices in Nebraska may contribute to this issue for soybean growers.

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Stripe rust in a field
Figure 1. Stripe rust in a state variety trial at the Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center (ENREC) near Mead, Sauders County, on June 2.

Wheat Disease Update: Stripe Rust, Leaf Rust, and Fusarium Head Blight

June 4, 2021
Leaf rust
Figure 2. Leaf rust in a research plot at Havelock Farm in Lincoln, Lancaster County, on June 1.

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Flooded wheat field
Figure 1. A flooded section of a grower’s wheat field in excellent condition in Deuel County on May 25.

Wheat Disease Update

May 27, 2021
Stripe rust and leaf rust confirmed in new counties; Fusarium head blight risk reported as moderate to high in southern Nebraska.

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Wheat stripe rust map

Wheat Disease Update

May 20, 2021
The wheat crop condition was good to excellent in the majority of fields surveyed this week in south central and southwest Nebraska. Stripe rust has been confirmed in 15 counties; leaf rust has been confirmed in one county. 

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Stripe rust

Stripe Rust Confirmed in 11 Counties in Southeast and South-central Nebraska

May 13, 2021
While leaf rust was not observed in any surveyed wheat fields, stripe rust was confirmed in 11 counties this week in southeast and south-central Nebraska.

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Stripe rust
Figure 1: Stripe rust (Photo by Nathan Mueller)

Track Stripe and Leaf Rust in Winter Wheat Across Nebraska

April 29, 2021
Producers are encouraged to report wheat stripe and leaf rust sightings again this year to help Nebraska Extension continue monitoring movement of these crop diseases throughout the state.

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soybean field

Soybean Micronutrient Management in Southeast Nebraska: Chloride

November 11, 2020
In soybeans, chloride is needed for osmotic regulation in plant cells. Deficiency symptoms are not clearly described but may include chlorosis and wilting of leaves in soybeans. Toxicity symptoms include leaf tip scorching, premature yellowing or bronzing of leaves, and leaf loss.

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soybean showing boron toxicity

Soybean Micronutrient Management in Southeast Nebraska: Boron

October 29, 2020
In soybeans, boron is needed for cell walls during cellular expansion and normal development of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Overall, soybeans are rather insensitive to boron deficiency but very sensitive to toxicity, including scorching/necrosis on the leaf edges.

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