Nathan Mueller - Extension Educator

Nathan Mueller

faculty
Work
PO Box 978 306 W 3rd St Wilber NE 68465-0978
US
Nathan serves as the Cropping Systems Extension Educator in Wilber, NE. After growing up on the family dairy farm northeast of Fremont, he earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree in agronomy from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and a PhD in agronomy from Kansas State University. His master’s degree focused on sediment and phosphorus movement in agricultural watersheds. His PhD research focused on soil fertility in corn and soybeans. Previous experience includes working for the Indiana State Department of Ag – Soil Conservation Division as a Resource Specialist Team Leader and assistant professor at SDSU serving as the state extension agronomist.

icon-academic-capEducation

  • Ph D, Kansas State University, 2012
  • MS, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2007
  • BS, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2005

icon-documentPublications and Other Intellectual Contributions

  • Effects of cultivars and nitrogen management on wheat grain yield and protein, Agronomy Journal, September 2021

icon-business-chartResearch & Grants

  • NE On-Farm Resrch-Soybean Brd EST 21-22, Ne Soybean Board, October 2021

icon-keynotePresentations

  • Winter Wheat Production in a Corn-Soybean Rotation, South Dakota Agri-Business Association, Sioux Falls, SD

icon-bookmark-starAwards & Honors

  • 2018 New Horizon Award, Nebraska Agribusiness Club, 2018
  • ASA Extension Education Community Award - Digital Decision Aids - 1st place, American Society of Agronomy, 2021
Area: Saline, Jefferson and Gage Counties

Degrees and Certifications
B.S. Agronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2005
M.S. Agronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 2007
Ph.D. Agronomy, Kansas State University, 2012
Certified Crop Adviser - NE #106079
Areas of Focus: Precision ag data management, on-farm research, soil fertility and plant nutrition, eastern Nebraska cropping systems
Twitter: @croptechcafe
Blog: Crop Tech Cafe

Figure 1. Winter wheat variety trial at the Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center, 2019. (Photos by Nathan Mueller)
Figure 1. Winter wheat variety trial at the Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center, 2019. (Photos by Nathan Mueller)

Eastern Nebraska Wheat, Pulse and Double Crop Field Day June 18

June 7, 2019
Variety trials and field research will be in the spotlight June 18 at the Eastern Nebraska Wheat, Pulse, and Double Crop Field Day at the Eastern Nebraska Research and Education Center near Mead.

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Figure 1. Leaf rust, powdery mildew, and a fungal leaf spot all present in a single plot at UNL’s Havelock Research Farm near Lincoln on June 6 (Photo by Stephen Wegulo)
Figure 1. Leaf rust, powdery mildew, and a fungal leaf spot all present in a single plot at UNL’s Havelock Research Farm near Lincoln on June 6. The white tip on the head in the upper center is due to freeze injury. (Photo by Stephen Wegulo)

Wheat Update: Diseases Are Increasing

June 7, 2019
Surveys of wheat fields in southeast Nebraska during the week of June 3 revealed a significant increase in diseases from the previous week.

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Wheat flowering
Figure 1. Wheat flowering in Clay County

Wheat Update

May 24, 2019
Wheat growth is running 7-10 days behind normal across much of the state, which may push the grain-fill period into some of the hottest days of the wheat season. Delayed development likely helped most wheat escape injury from snow and low temperatures early this week.

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Figure 1. A research plot at the university’s Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center (ENREC) near Mead on May 13, 2019. The entire plot is covered with no-till corn residue. The west half also is covered with a November 17 planted cereal rye cover crop. Soil temperatures 2 inches deep were recorded in each half, but were essentially the same, so are averaged in this report.
Figure 1. A research plot at the university’s Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center (ENREC) near Mead on May 13, 2019. The entire plot is covered with no-till corn residue. The west half also is covered with a November 17 planted cereal rye cover crop. Soil temperatures 2 inches deep were recorded in each half, but were essentially the same, so are averaged in this report.

Soybean Germination/Emergence with April Planting Dates Relative to Coincident Air and Soil Temperatures in April and May

May 16, 2019
A closer look at air and soil temperatures in April and soybean germination and emergence from 10 planting dates did not find chilling injury, despite periods below 50°F. Further research is needed to better understand the imbibitional period in soybean.

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Early planted wheat field in Nuckolls County; taken early May 2019

Eastern Nebraska Winter Wheat Update

May 3, 2019
Wheat in eastern Nebraska is behind normal growth stage, but has good yield potential. Weather in late May and early June, as wheat enters the critical grain fill stage, will likely dictate final yield.

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Research plot with no-till corn residue, with left half planted to cereal rye in November 2018

Considerations when Planting Soybean Early

April 25, 2019
If you're planning to get an early start on your soybean planting, be sure to check for recommended soil temperatures and the forecast for the coming 48 hours to ensure optimal conditions for achieving good emergence.

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Layout of data-intensive prescription research conducted in Saunders County
Layout of data-intensive prescription research conducted in Saunders County

Soybean Seeding Rates

April 18, 2019
Research from Nebraska farmers and Midwest universities suggests seeding rates for soybeans can often be decreased without affecting yield. These decreases could save growers $10 an acre in seed costs.

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Screen show of the video, Growing Annual Forages, one of five available from the April 9, 2019 post-flood meeting.

Growing Annual Forages to Replace Flood Losses

April 12, 2019
Five video presentations are now available to address seed selection and production of annual forages that might be used to replace hay and pasture lost to the flood. Topics include successful forage production, nutrient value of the feed, and related government program.

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