Jenny Rees - Extension Educator

Jenny Rees

Twitter: @jenreesources
Blog: JenReesources Extension Blog

Figure 1. A research plot at the university’s Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center (ENREC) near Mead on May 13, 2019. The entire plot is covered with no-till corn residue. The west half also is covered with a November 17 planted cereal rye cover crop. Soil temperatures 2 inches deep were recorded in each half, but were essentially the same, so are averaged in this report.
Figure 1. A research plot at the university’s Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center (ENREC) near Mead on May 13, 2019. The entire plot is covered with no-till corn residue. The west half also is covered with a November 17 planted cereal rye cover crop. Soil temperatures 2 inches deep were recorded in each half, but were essentially the same, so are averaged in this report.

Soybean Germination/Emergence with April Planting Dates Relative to Coincident Air and Soil Temperatures in April and May May 16, 2019

A closer look at air and soil temperatures in April and soybean germination and emergence from 10 planting dates did not find chilling injury, despite periods below 50°F. Further research is needed to better understand the imbibitional period in soybean.

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With Delayed Corn Planting, Is It Time To Switch Maturities? May 9, 2019

Research suggests that staying with a full-season hybrid until late May often provides the best yield. If planting is delayed to late May or early June, consider a medium-season CRM might be considered.

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When estimating whether severely injured plants will survive, check the growing point. Healthy growing point is yellow/white and firm as is shown in this picture. Unhealthy growing point is discolored and soft to the touch.
When estimating whether severely injured plants will survive, check the growing point. Healthy growing point is yellow/white and firm as is shown in this picture. Unhealthy growing point is discolored and soft to the touch.

Replanting Corn: Things To Do and Think About May 8, 2019

If the first signs of corn emergence (or lack of emergence in some field areas) are causing you concern, follow these steps for assessing the stand and evaluating whether replanting would be advisable.

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Early planted wheat field in Nuckolls County; taken early May 2019

Eastern Nebraska Winter Wheat Update May 3, 2019

Wheat in eastern Nebraska is behind normal growth stage, but has good yield potential. Weather in late May and early June, as wheat enters the critical grain fill stage, will likely dictate final yield.

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Research plot with no-till corn residue, with left half planted to cereal rye in November 2018

Considerations when Planting Soybean Early April 25, 2019

If you're planning to get an early start on your soybean planting, be sure to check for recommended soil temperatures and the forecast for the coming 48 hours to ensure optimal conditions for achieving good emergence.

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Planter ready to enter the field.

Corn and Soybean Planting Considerations April 24, 2019

Planting sets the stage for a successful crop with an even emergence and stand. Consider these tips to help ensure you're providing favorable planting condition via proper soil conditions, planting window, planting depth, and seeding rates.

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Graph showing irrigated corn yield departure from Trend-Line Yields and Corn Planting Progress by April 29 for 1985-2018 (excluding 1993 data) in Nebraska. From USDA-NASS survey data.

Windows of Opportunity for Corn Planting: Nebraska Data April 24, 2019

Does early planting of corn necessarily result in higher yields? An examination of Nebraska research and data from USDA NASS sheds light on the question, indicating that, up to mid-May, other factors may affect final yield more than planting date.

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Graph of multiple Corn Belt studies looking at the optimum corn planting window

Windows of Opportunity for Corn Planting: Data from Across the Corn Belt April 24, 2019

A survey of published research on corn planting dates in the central northern Corn Belt indicates there is a window from mid-April to mid-May when optimum yields can be achieved.

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