Strahinja Stepanovic - Extension Educator

Strahinja Stephanovic

(student, faculty)
Graduate Student Agronomy Grad Studies
Work
76025 Rd 329 Grant NE 69140
US

Twitter: @agwithstrahinja
Blog: Ag with Strahinja
Core Extension Programs: Nebraska Ag Water Management Network (NAWMN), on-farm research, Field pea sustainability and production

Focus Areas
  • Water conservation and management in semiarid dryland and irrigated cropping systems
  • Agronomic evaluation of farming practices
  • Weed, insect and disease resistance management

Test plots showing sorghum (center) and other crops double-cropped after field peas in Saunders County in eastern Nebraska.

Double Cropping Pulses with Short-Season Crops, Forages, and Cover Crops in Eastern Nebraska September 6, 2018

A research project in eastern Nebraska is evaluating a double crop production system as a potential alternative to the traditional corn/soybean rotation. Following an early season crop of yellow field peas, short-season crops (corn, soybean, grain sorghum, millet and sunflower) and annual forages (forage sorghum and sorghum-Sudangrass) were planted.

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Aerial image of field showing differences between 15-inch and 30-inch row spacings
Figure 1. TerrAvion aerial imagery taken on Aug 4, 2017 at Chase County site showing less vigor and higher thermal stress in 30-inch row soybeans than in 15-inch row soybeans.

How Row Spacng Affects Irrigated Soybean in Southwest Nebraska April 27, 2018

While continuous corn is the most common cropping sequence in southwest Nebraska, adding soybeans to a rotation could help break pest cycles. On-farm research comparing 15- and 30-inch soybean row spacing found increased yields of 4-12 bu/ac with an average 7 bu/ac increase with 15-inch rows.

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Figure 1. (left) Carryover injury of atrazine (2 lb ai/ac applied in the fall) and (right) mesotrione (applied in the spring) on field peas.
Figure 1. Carryover injury of atrazine (2 lb ai/ac applied in the fall) and mesotrione (applied in the spring) on field peas.

Field Peas—A Guide to Herbicide Carryover And Herbicide Efficacy February 22, 2018

How to avoid herbicide carryover injury when designing an effective herbicide program for crop rotations integrating field peas.

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Pulse crops
Figure 1. Field peas (left) and chick peas are part of the growing pulse crop industry in western Nebraska. Register by Jan. 16 for the Pulse Crops Workshop, Expo or both to engage with industry representatives and growers and learn about the latest research.

January Pulse Crop Programs Offer Two Approaches to Fit Your Needs January 9, 2018

Learn about and engage with the expanding pulse crop industry at two events being held in western Nebraska this month: the Pulse Crops Workshop Jan. 17 at Bridgeport and the Pulse Crops Expo Jan. 18 at Grant. Check the agendas and register for one or both events by Jan. 16.

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Figure 1. (left) Field pea variety trial in Perkins, one of five field day sites this year.

Field Pea Field Days Scheduled for June at 5 Locations across Nebraska May 24, 2017

Field day participants will be able to view field pea varieties and learn about rotational benefits and agronomic practices to profitably grow field peas and integrate them with existing cropping systems.

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Field pea

Yellow Field Peas Fare Well After Recent Lows May 4, 2017

Most yellow field pea being grown in western Nebraska were at early vegetative stages (4th to 7th node or 1-5 leaf stages) during last week’s cold snap, but extensive damage is not expected due to the pea’s level of frost tolerance.Field pea tolerance to frost during early stages of vegetative growth is partially due to the “hypogeal” germination nature of the crop. For plant species with hypogeal germination (e.g., field pea, lentil, chickpea), shoot germination occurs belowground.

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Field pea

Field Pea Seeding Rates, Seeding Depth, and Inoculant March 13, 2017

Grain-type field peas are a cool season grain crop grown as an alternative for no-till summer fallow in a semiarid cereal-based cropping systems such as wheat-corn-fallow and/or wheat-fallow. They are typically planted in mid-March and harvested late-July. This article reports on research conducted on seeding practices and offers recommendations for producers on the economically optimal seeding rate, seeding depth, and inoculant to grow field peas in western Nebraska.

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