Stephen Wegulo - Extension Plant Pathologist

Stephen Wegulo

faculty
Work Plant Sciences Hall (PLSH) 406H
Lincoln NE 68583-0722
US
Work 402-472-8735 On campus, dial 2-8735

Faculty Bio
Website: Wheat Disease section of CropWatch Plant Disease Management
Twitter: @wegulo2

Goss's Wilt of corn

Nebraska Plant Pathology: A Culture of New Diseases January 23, 2019

Though relatively small, UNL's Department of Plant Pathology has played a significant role in the discovery of many economically important plant diseases, including most recently, a new fungal pathogen causing Fusarium head blight of wheat. This article is from the 2019 Nebraska Crop Management Conference Proceedings.

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Bacterial leaf streak in wheat

Wheat Disease Update: Bacterial Streak and Black Chaff January 10, 2019

In this article from the Proceedings of the 2019 Crop Production Clinics the author reviews disease impacts in wheat, particularly bacterial streak, also known as black chaff.

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What’s New in Plant Pathology January 9, 2019

This article, from the Proceedings of the 2019 Crop Production Clinics, addresses new and updated product labels for disease management, a report from the Plant and Pest Diagnostic Clinic, changes in the Department of Plant Pathology, and the initial US finding of Fusarium boothii on wheat in Nebraska.

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UNL variety trials conducted in eastern Nebraska are an important process to help guide grower’s variety selection.
Figure 1. UNL variety trials conducted in eastern Nebraska are an important process to help guide grower’s variety selection.

Winter Wheat Varieties with an Eastern Nebraska Fit September 27, 2018

Winter wheat growers in eastern Nebraska will want to check out the newer winter wheat varieties described here as well as a table of comparable traits to aid in selecting a variety best suited for their operation.

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Stinking smut (left) and loose smut of winter wheat
Fungal diseases of wheat include stinking smut (left, Figure 1) and loose smut (right, Figure 2). (Photos by Stephen Wegulo)

Should I Plant Treated Wheat Seed? August 29, 2018

Using clean, certified, treated winter wheat seed optimizes the chances of obtaining high yields. Seed-transmitted diseases and fall insects can reduce grain yield as well as quality next summer.

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Photos of two very different eastern Nebraska wheat fields
Figure 1. Photos of both of these eastern Nebraska wheat fields were taken June 16, 2018 and show the contrast between wheat grown in Thayer County (left) in southeast Nebraska where precipitation was much below normal and a field in Washington County in east central Nebraska where there was sufficient soil mosture throughout the season. (Photos by Brad Heinrichs (left) and Nathan Mueller)

Recap of 2017-18 Eastern Nebraska Winter Wheat Crop July 25, 2018

Winter wheat yields in eastern Nebraska were quite variable in 2018, ranging from 10 to 80 bu/ac, depending on precipitation. This review of the growing season examines some of the factors affecting yields in southeast, east central, and northeast Nebraska.

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2018 wheat field day at the High Plains Ag Lab
Figure 1. Attendees look at wheat plots and listen to UNL small grains breeder P. Stephen Baenziger at the High Plains Ag Lab in Cheyenne County on June 21. (Photos by Stephen Wegulo)

Wheat Disease Update for Central to Western Nebraska June 22, 2018

Wheat diseases were found at varying levels across a wide area of fields surveyed this week in western Nebraska in conjunction with the 2018 Wheat Tours.

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2018 Wheat Field Day at the Eastern Nebraska REC near Mead.
Figure 1. Attendees view wheat varieties and listen to UNL Small Grains Breeder Stephen Baenziger and Nebraska Extension Educator Nathan Mueller during a wheat plot tour at the Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center (ENREC) near Mead June 12. (Photos by Stephen Wegulo)

Wheat Update: Diseases Increasing June 13, 2018

Recent rains have created favorable conditions for disease development in wheat. If irrigating, manage applications to reduce further development and spread of diseases.

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