Stevan Knezevic - Extension Weed Management Specialist

Stevan Knezevic

(faculty)
Work
HAL 57905 866 Rd Concord NE 68728-2828
US
Work 402-584-3808 On-campus 7-3808

Faculty Bio

Field tour of purple loosestrife management study
Figure 1. Nebraska research showed the need for multiple years of treatment to achieve complete control of purple loosestrife. Choosing the right herbicide for the job and practicing patience and persistance were key to success. (Photos by Stevan Knezevic)

Research Update: Control of Perennial Invasive Weeds Requires Repeated Herbicide Applications June 4, 2018

Research shows the need for patience and persistence when battling perennial weeds such as purple loosestrife over multiple years. The younger the stand the faster the control was achieved.

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Figure 1. Palmer amaranth curling within a week of spraying a postemergence dicamba product to corn. (Photo by Jenny Rees)

Considerations for Postemergence Dicamba-based Herbicide Applications to Corn May 31, 2018

With postemergence herbicide applications occurring to corn, consider these best management practices to improve results and reduce the potential for off-target injury from your dicamba application.

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Buckbrush
Figure 1: Buckbrush (4-year-old plant) in pasture by Niobrara State Park in northeast Nebraska. (Photo by Stevan Knezevic)

Study: Efficacy of Herbicides in Buckbrush Control May 22, 2018

A two-year weed management study in northeast Nebraska evaluated herbicide options for controlling buckbrush, a common perennial weed in Nebraska pastures and rangeland. One herbicide provided year-round control, while several others provided season-long control.

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Cottonwoods
Figure 1. Cottonwood infestation in sub-irrigated meadow. This photo was taken during the period of high water table in early spring. (Photo by Stevan Knezevic)

Research Findings on Chemical Control of Cottonwood May 22, 2018

Cottonwood offers many benefits, but also can be an invasive and difficult-to-control weed. Nebraska researchers studied control efficacy of eight herbicides over two years and found three products provided total control more than a year; however, they also noted a caution for areas with high water tables.

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Field trial comparing timing of soybean weed management
Figure 1. (left) Soybean without preemergence herbicide at V6 stage and (right) soybean with preemergence herbicide at V6 stage.

Preemergence Herbicides Delayed the Critical Time for Weed Removal in Soybean May 16, 2018

Researchers tested two herbicide strategies in soybean to see how preemergence herbicides would delay the critical time of weed removal, likely reducing the number of herbicide applications needed in a season.

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Field photos of the three herbicide treatments tested.
Figure 1. Three herbicide treatments were applied to determine whether a pre-emergence herbicide affected the critical period of weed control. From left, the plots show: 1) Corn at V12 that had not received a pre-emergence herbicide; 2) corn at V12 that received an atrazine treatment; corn at V12 that received an Acuron treatment

Preemergence Herbicides Influence the Critical Period for Weed Removal in Roundup Ready Corn May 11, 2018

Researchers tested three preemergence herbicide strategies in Roundup-Ready Corn to identify how their application affected the critical period of weed control — the period when weed control is essential to avoid yield loss.

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Dicamba injury to a grape plant

Sensitivity of Grape and Tomato to Micro-rates of Dicamba-Based Herbicides May 3, 2018

Researchers report on a study to confirm the level of sensitivity of grapes and tomatoes to 1/10 and 1/100 of the label rate of dicamba. The studies were conducted with pot-grown grape and tomato plants during the summers of 2016 and 2017 at the Haskell Ag Lab.

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The Rise of Multiple-Resistance in Nebraska’s Weeds and Effects Of Dicamba Micro-Rates on Sensitive Crops April 16, 2018

Weed resistance to herbicides is a global problem, which usually results from the repeated use of herbicides with the same mode of action. Simply said: “Weeds just got used to that mode of action and cannot be killed with that mode of action anymore.” Similar phenomenon is observed in medicine with disease resistance to antibiotics.

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