Rodrigo Werle - Cropping Systems Specialist

Rodrigo Werle

(faculty)
Work
Moore Hall 356 Madison 53706
US

CW Welcome: New WCREC Cropping Systems Specialist
Twitter: @UNLCroppingSyst

In January 2018 Dr. Werle joined the Department of Agronomy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as an Extension Cropping Systems Weed Scientist. He can be reached at rwerle@wisc.edu or 608-262-7130.

field pea comparison
Figure 1. Comparison of water use of two systems -- summer fallow and field peas -- between March 27 and July 20. (Photos by Stranhinja Stepanovic)

Field Pea Production: Rotational Costs and Benefits March 10, 2017

Research findings show benefits in soil nutrient cycling, water infiltration, and microbial activity from replacing fallow with grain-type field peas in a wheat-fallow rotation in western Nebraska.

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kochia seedlings
kochia seedlings

Q&A: When is the Best Time for Kochia Control? February 23, 2017

Wondering how best to manage the flush of winter annuals that came up during the recent warm spell? Are they likely to survive a return to winter conditions? This Q&A addresses these and related questions on pre-season weed management.

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Soybean field in Brazil
One of the soybean fields Nebraska Extension Weed Management Specialist Rodrigo Werle visited during a recent trip to Brazil.

A Quick Look at Soybean Production In Southeast Brazil February 8, 2017

This winter Rodrigo Werle, Nebraska Extension Cropping Systems Specialist, visited several progressive soybean growers in Brazil. See what three major practices these growers prioritize.

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Figure 1. Marestail seedling growing in a no-till field. Due to its small size in the fall, pay special attention during scouting, especially in no-till fields where residue can hide seedlings.during scouting.
Figure 1. Marestail seedling growing in a no-till field. Due to its small size in the fall, pay special attention during scouting, especially in no-till fields where residue can hide seedlings.

Fall is Optimal for Marestail Management October 28, 2016

With corn and soybean harvest nearing completion in Nebraska this is a great time to begin scouting fields for winter annual weeds like marestail. Timing is critical to successful control of marestail, especially in no-till soybeans as many populations have evolved resistance to glyphosate and ALS-inhibiting herbicides.

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It usually takes five to 10 years of research and testing before a new wheat variety is released for production. (Photo by David Ostdiek)
It usually takes five to 10 years of research and testing before a new wheat variety is released for production. (Photo by David Ostdiek)

2016 Winter Wheat Varieties for Nebraska September 1, 2016

Recommendations for identifying and selecting wheat varieties best suited to your location, based on variety trial results, and other factors to manage to achieve high yields.

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While yields were high, protein content in Nebraska's wheat this year was below normal in many instances, likely due to environmental and management factors. (Photos by Cody Creech)
While yields were high, protein content in Nebraska's wheat this year was below normal in many instances, likely due to environmental and management factors. (Photos by Rodrigo Werle)

Nebraska 2016 Wheat – High Yields, Low Protein September 1, 2016

Environmental conditions, management, and genetic differences played a role in why protein content in the 2016 wheat crop was lower than normal. Wheat protein develops as the plant converts nitrogen from the soil into amino acids. See what conditions led to low protein this season and how to address it for next year's crop.

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Russian thistle in wheat stubble.
Russian thistle in wheat stubble.

Fall Weed Control Options for Winter Wheat August 31, 2016

Weed management is a long-term battle that needs to continue even in tight margin years.Although herbicide costs may seem prohibitive, it’s important to consider the long-term implications of limiting or eliminating the use of herbicides in crop production systems.Weeds left unmanaged after wheat harvest use valuable nutrients and water needed for the following year’s crop while producing seeds to replenish the soil seed bank.

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Wheat cut high
Wheat cut high

The Value of Wheat in a Crop Rotation August 31, 2016

Wheat is an important part of many crop rotations, adding value directly and often indirectly by aiding in soil water management and weed suppression, reducing erosion, and helping manage pest cycles. Consider wheat's value to your crop production system by looking at what it contributes over multiple years of the rotation.

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