Amit Jhala - Extension Weed Management Specialist

Spraying the New Phenoxy Herbicide Formulations in Xtend and Enlist Soybeans Will Present Challenges May 11, 2017

The new phenoxy herbicide formulations, including Enlist Duo™ (Dow), XtendiMax® (Monsanto), Engenia™ (BASF), and FeXapan™ (DuPont), offer growers new management options along with new application requirements. To alleviate problems related to applying new phenoxy herbicide formulations in soybeans as well as to increase herbicide performance, manufacturers have established application requirements. Here we discuss some of the key application factors to consider.

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soybean seedling

Timing is Critical with Pre-Emergence Flumioxazin-Based Herbicides in Soybeans April 26, 2017

Soybean planting has started in Nebraska and it’s time to apply pre-emergence herbicides. Six weeds have evolved resistance to glyphosate in Nebraska. The best way to effectively control resistant and other hard-to-control weeds is by applying residual, pre-emergence herbicides with multiple effective modes of action. Several new herbicides recently registered in soybean are in this category and could be considered.

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Field of soybeans
Figure 1. If a fomesafen-based herbicide (Flexstar/ Flexstar GT/ Marvel/Rumble) was applied in soybean in 2016, maintain 10 months of planting interval to corn this year.

Planting Interval of Corn after Previous Year's Soybean Herbicides April 21, 2017

Corn-soybean is the most common cropping system in eastern Nebraska. While corn growers are getting ready for planting this season, it is important to pay attention to the planting interval of herbicides applied the previous year in soybean. Certain soybean herbicides have relatively longer planting intervals for corn, especially if they are applied post-emergence in soybean. This is particularly important because soybean planting was late last year in much of Nebraska due to May rains. This caused postemergence herbicides to be applied later in the season than they might normally be, making it important that you pay attention to the planting interval.

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soybean field

Planting Soybean after Soybean (Part 1): Planting Considerations April 13, 2017

Farmers are increasing their soybean plantings for 2017, which likely means some are shifting to soybeans-after-soybeans. This article looks at what you should be considering at planting time as you consider changing your cropping sequence.

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Center pivot irrigated soybeans
Management in a successful soybean-after-soybean cropping system may require growers to make some slight adjustments in their practices, including irrigation, seed selection, and pest management.

Planting Soybean after Soybean (Part 2): In-Season Management Considerations April 13, 2017

In Part 1 of this article, we look at considerations for planting soybean after soybean. In this article, Part 2, we share considerations for in-season management.

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Uuncontrolled giant ragweed

Planting Interval of Corn and Soybean after 2,4-D/ Dicamba Burndown Application April 7, 2017

With cold, wet conditions in March, many producers may be facing a smaller than expected window for making their herbicide burndown applications in April. This makes timely applications now even more important to provide for a proper interval before planting this year.

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marestail

Status of Herbicide-Resistant Weeds in Nebraska March 20, 2017

Nine weed species in Nebraska have now evolved resistance to at least one group of herbicides. Six weed species — common ragweed, common waterhemp, marestail, kochia, giant ragweed, and Palmer amaranth — have confirmed resistance to glyphosate. Rotate herbicide sites of action and weed control practice to avoid contributing to this trend.

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glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth
Figure 1. A female glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth plant in a soybean field in south-central Nebraska. This plant has the capacity to produce up to half a million seeds. (All photos by Parminder Chahal)

Glyphosate-Resistant Palmer Amaranth Confirmed in South-Central Nebraska March 15, 2017

Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.) is a C4 dioecious species (separate male and female plants) native to the southwestern United States.

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