Amit Jhala - Extension Weed Management Specialist

field pennycress post herbicide app
Figure 1. Survival of field pennycress due to application of burndown herbicide when the temperature was below 40°F for an extended time. (Photos by Amit Jhala)

Low Temperature and Frost May Affect Efficacy of Burndown Herbicides November 9, 2017

In many areas fall herbicide applications were delayed due to the late harvest. Applications can still be effective, depending on weeds present, temperature, rate of herbicide and additives used. The article offers recommendations for these late-fall applications and their importance, particularly for control of herbicide-resistant marestail.

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Figure 1. This new Nebraska Extension circular offers information on distinguishing the major grasses found in Nebraska cropland when they're small and should be managed. (A) Auricles of Canada wildrye clasping the stem, and (B) ligule and auricles of Canada wildrye.

New Nebraska Resource on Identifying Grass Weeds in Crops September 13, 2017

A new Nebraska Extension guide shows how to identify and differentiate various grass weeds common to Nebraska agronomic fields.

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Cover of NebGuide G2276

Review Herbicide Restrictions Before Planting Forage Cover Crops September 8, 2017

Forage cover crops after corn or soybean have restrictive plant-back restrictions. These two Nebraska Extension resources offer further information on what to check before planting cover crops this fall.

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Figure 1. Dicamba injury to 40 acres of soybean near Geneva due to volatility/temperature inversion. (Photo by Amit Jhala)

Tell Us about Your Dicamba Use and Suspected Injury in Soybean August 18, 2017

Nebraska Extension educators and specialists would like to hear from growers and agribusiness about their experiences with dicamba this season. Information can be shared via an online survey or by contacting them directly with the email provided.

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Dicamba injury symptoms in a Roundup Ready soybean field
Figure 1. Dicamba injury symptoms in a Roundup Ready soybean field near Geneva. (Photos by Amit Jhala)

Dicamba Injury Reports Rise in Nebraska July 18, 2017

Reports of suspected dicamba injury to soybean and other sensitive crops are increasing. The author reviews application windows for dicamba in corn, a possible area of concern, and outlines what growers can do if they suspect dicamba injury in their fields.

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Liberty Link soybeans
Figure 1. Control of glyphosate-resistant common waterhemp with Valor XLT applied PRE followed by Liberty in Liberty Link soybean (Photos by Amit Jhala).

Liberty Label Revision Allows Rate Increase July 13, 2017

Liberty has revised its label to provide for an increased application rate in corn and soybean. View the new label rates for corn and soybean with a cumulative maximum per year of 87 fl oz/acre for either crop.

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In Figure 1a the field on the right, with heavier crop residue, shows dicamba-tolerant soybeans that had been sprayed with new generation dicamba. The field on the left, non-dicamba-tolerant soybeans planted side-by-side without a buffer, shows symptoms of injury caused by dicamba, the consequences of spray drift or volatilization. Figure 1b illustrates how dicamba affects newer growth more than older leaves. (Photos by Tim Creger, Nebraska Department of Agriculture)

Dicamba Injury Symptoms on Sensitive Crops June 28, 2017

Dicamba-resistant soybean, genetically engineered to provide resistance to dicamba and glyphosate, was made commercially available for the 2017 growing season. This article looks at potential dicamba injury to sensitive crops and plants.

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Palmer amaranth in corn
Figure 1. Glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth infesting corn field in south central Nebraska. (Photos by Amit Jhala)

Grower Q&A: Is this Herbicide-Resistant Palmer Amaranth? June 23, 2017

This week growers facing challenges with Palmer amaranth questioned whether it was due to the product, the environment and lack of rain, or a resistant weed. Several factors could be at play, notes a UNL weed scientist, who recommends starting with preemergence herbicides with residual activity to get the best control.

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