Charles Wortmann - Extension Soil and Nutrient Management Specialist

Charles Wortmann

(faculty)
Work Keim Hall (KEIM) 369
Lincoln NE 68583-0915
US
Work 402-472-2909 On-campus 2-2909

Faculty Bio


Research Cited in CW
How Manure Impacts Soil Aggregation

What’s New with P Fertilizer Use? April 5, 2018

Studies conducted at three sites over six years with varying levels of phosphorus (P) applications indicate when a P application may be profitable.

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What’s New with K Fertilizer Use? April 5, 2018

Three studies with a total of 50 trials applying K at various rates to corn verified that the likelihood of a profitable response is very low if the soil test level is above 125 ppm.

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What's New with S Fertilizer Use? April 5, 2018

When is applying sulfur likely to be profitable and when is it cutting into your potential profit? This brief shares information from more than 100 university trials verifying current university recommendations.

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Nutrient Management for Organic Production April 5, 2018

The NebGuide, Nutrient Management in Organic Farming, features information also of value to conventional production, including manure management, composting, non-traditional products, and crop rotation suggestions.

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CO2 sensor in rye cover crop

Cover Crop and CO2 Emissions February 26, 2018

Do cover crops affect CO2 emissions from the soil and if so, under what conditions? These were among the questions addressed by university researchers monitoring CO2 emissions from cereal rye cover crops in irrigated and dryland no-till continuous corn treatments.

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Taking CO2 measurements in plots where residue has been baled
Taking CO2 measurements in plots where residue has been baled

Corn Residue Removal and CO2 Emissions February 26, 2018

University research looking at CO2 emissions from two types of residue removal (baling and grazing) compared with a control treatment found little day-to-day impact; however, when looking at cumulative data for the whole year, grazing did appear to affect cumulative CO2 emissions in irrigated crop-livestock systems. This data represents the first year of this study.

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Figure 1. Based corn stalk residue.
Figure 1. Where moisture is not limited, research shows that removing some corn residue from a field may benefit yield in the following crop. However, if residue is removed for more than three years, research showed longer term impacts to the soil.

Crop Residue Removal: Impacts on Yield December 8, 2017

A review of multiple research studies indicates that where moisture is not limited, residue removal can result in no yield reduction to yield increases for the subsequent crop. However, long-term residue removal has been shown to affect other production factors and it's recommended that even in minimal erosion areas, removing residue does impact other production factors and it's recommended that 2.4 tons/acre of residue be left in the field.

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Figure 1. Corn stalk residue with downed ears, baled and ready to use. (Photo by Jenny Rees)
Figure 1. Corn stalk residue with downed ears baled and ready to use. (Photo by Jenny Rees)

Corn Stover Removal: Nutrient Value of Stover and Impacts on Soil Properties December 7, 2017

Corn residue has a number of uses and thus its value as well as its impact on other systems may need to be estimated when evaluating post-harvest options. This article looks at how to estimate the nutrient value of the residue and potential impacts to the soil from removing the residue, based on Nebraska research.

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