Roger Elmore - Extension Cropping Systems Agronomist

Roger Elmore

faculty
Work Keim Hall (KEIM) 165
Lincoln NE 68583-0915
US
Work 402-472-1451 On campus, dial 2-1451
Roger Elmore, is an University of Nebraska–Lincoln agronomy and horticulture professor, Heuermann Chair and interim associate department head. Elmore, a Nebraska Extension cropping systems specialist and Water for Food Daugherty Global Institute Faculty Fellow, has spent his entire career addressing agronomic issues relevant to the immediate needs of crop producers. He provides research information that is science-based, timely, and relevant to a diverse audience. Elmore has a long history of applied crop production research and extension programs focused on maintaining or increasing crop production, profitability, and water use efficiency by seeking and demonstrating environmentally sound production practices. His focus is on research and developing, teaching and extending timely and pertinent crop management information for farmers, agribusiness, extension personnel and students. His most significant research contributions have centered on evaluating corn growth and yield response to extreme weather events. He has been able to engage diverse groups based on this research with high-impact extension programming. He co-leads a cover crop research project supported by the Nebraska Soybean Board and the Nebraska Corn Board. He has served as a consultant for various organizations across the globe and he was worked on projects in Ghana, China, Argentina and Puerto Rico. He was employed with the University of Nebraska–Lincoln for 24 years before spending nearly nine years as a corn extension specialist at Iowa State University where he lead development of the “Corn growth and development” extension publication — one of his most important extension contributions to date. He returned to Nebraska in 2014 as a cropping systems agronomist. Having a successful career as a cropping systems agronomist focusing primarily on corn and soybean production, Elmore believes in the synergism of effective teams and has been able to develop and deliver effective state, regional, national and international programs.

icon-academic-capEducation

  • Other, Illinois Valley Community College, 1972
  • BS, Illinois State University, 1974
  • MS, University of Illinois, 1978
  • Ph D, University of Illinois, 1981

icon-business-chartResearch & Grants

  • Sustainable Corn/Soybean Production, Ne Soybean Board, October 2017
  • Sustainable Corn/Soybean Production, Ne Corn Board, July 2015

icon-bookmark-starAwards & Honors

  • Fellow, Crop Science Society of America, 2017
  • Agronomic Education and Extension Award , American Society of Agronomy, 2017

Faculty Bio

Soybeans with purple seed stain (left) and soybeans showing signs of seed decay due to Phomopsis disease complex. (Photo by Jenny Rees)
Figure 1. Soybeans with purple seed stain (left) and soybeans showing signs of seed decay due to Phomopsis disease complex. (Photo by Jenny Rees)

Soybean Seed Germination Concerns February 13, 2019

Average germination rates of new crop soybean being tested by the Nebraska Crop Improvement Association are lower than in recent years. Growers are urged to check the germination rate for their soybean seed and adjust planting rate and use of fungicide treatments accordingly.

Read more

Modern corn hybrids, shown here, differ significantly from hybrids of 50 years ago.

Corn Growth and Development: Updating an Old Paradigm of Dry Matter and Nutrient Accumulation and Partitioning January 23, 2019

From the 1960s to the 2000s corn hybrids have changed dramatically in appearance and yield. Nutrient content, concentrations and partitioning also have changed and are the focus of this article for the Nebraska Crop Management Conference Jan. 28-29.

Read more

Bar graph showing distribution of various ear abnormalities within the tested group.

Corn Growth and Development: What We Have Learned About Corn Development From Studying Ear Issues January 23, 2019

In an effort to better understand the causal agents of ear formation issues first seen in corn in 2016-2017, researchers laid out an experiment in 2018 to typify types of ear formation damage as well as possible factors contributing to damage.

Read more

Hairy vetch cover crop

Impact of Cover Crop Management on Rainfed Corn Production in Western Nebraska January 9, 2019

Researchers report their findings from a one-year cover crop study at two sites in western Nebraska to study the impact of planting and termination dates and cover crop species selection. This article is part of the Crop Production Clinic Proceedings 2019.

Read more

Comparison of aboveground biomass amounts and total N when using hairy vetch or cereal rye as cover crops.

Cover Crops Benefit Nebraska Agroecosystems In Many Ways January 9, 2019

Across Nebraska, the use of cover crops is increasing. Most commonly, winter cover crops are planted during the fallow period between corn or soybean harvest and the next crop. However, other windows for cover cropping exist in Nebraska.

Read more

Figure 1. Marestail emerging relatively early this year in Nebraska due to plenty of moisture (Photo by Amit Jhala)

Management of Glyphosate-Resistant Marestail in Fall October 25, 2018

For successful marestail management in the fall, apply herbicides after harvest while weather conditions remain favorable (air temperature above 50°F). Effective control now may negate the need for an early spring burndown application.

Read more

Figure 1. Drilling cereal rye into corn stubble in Dodge County, October 19, 2018.
Figure 1. Drilling cereal rye into corn stubble in Dodge County, October 19, 2018. (Photo by Katja Koehler-Cole)

It’s Not Too Late to Plant Cereal Rye as a Nitrogen Catch Crop Before Soybean October 24, 2018

In trials conducted at three research stations in eastern, northeastern and south-central Nebraska, researchers investigated rye productivity and its ability to scavenge N when grown as a cover crop between full-season corn and soybeans.

Read more

Map indicating end-of-season deviations from average corn yields for select sites in the Corn Belt
Map indicating end-of-season deviations from average corn yields for select sites in the Corn Belt

Oct. 16 Corn Yield Forecast - End of Season Report October 19, 2018

The end-of-season corn yield report finds that high temperatures during vegetative stages had little impact on forecasted yield potential. This is the final article in the series looking at simulated crop stages and yield forecasts for 41 locations across the US Corn Belt.

Read more

Pages