Roger Elmore - Extension Cropping Systems Agronomist

Roger Elmore

faculty
Work Keim Hall (KEIM) 165
Lincoln NE 68583-0915
US
Work 402-472-2811 On campus, dial 2-2811
Roger Elmore, is an University of Nebraska–Lincoln agronomy and horticulture professor, Heuermann Chair and interim associate department head. Elmore, a Nebraska Extension cropping systems specialist and Water for Food Daugherty Global Institute Faculty Fellow, has spent his entire career addressing agronomic issues relevant to the immediate needs of crop producers. He provides research information that is science-based, timely, and relevant to a diverse audience. Elmore has a long history of applied crop production research and extension programs focused on maintaining or increasing crop production, profitability, and water use efficiency by seeking and demonstrating environmentally sound production practices. His focus is on research and developing, teaching and extending timely and pertinent crop management information for farmers, agribusiness, extension personnel and students. His most significant research contributions have centered on evaluating corn growth and yield response to extreme weather events. He has been able to engage diverse groups based on this research with high-impact extension programming. He co-leads a cover crop research project supported by the Nebraska Soybean Board and the Nebraska Corn Board. He has served as a consultant for various organizations across the globe and he was worked on projects in Ghana, China, Argentina and Puerto Rico. He was employed with the University of Nebraska–Lincoln for 24 years before spending nearly nine years as a corn extension specialist at Iowa State University where he lead development of the “Corn growth and development” extension publication — one of his most important extension contributions to date. He returned to Nebraska in 2014 as a cropping systems agronomist. Having a successful career as a cropping systems agronomist focusing primarily on corn and soybean production, Elmore believes in the synergism of effective teams and has been able to develop and deliver effective state, regional, national and international programs.

icon-academic-capEducation

  • Other, Illinois Valley Community College, 1972
  • BS, Illinois State University, 1974
  • MS, University of Illinois, 1978
  • Ph D, University of Illinois, 1981

icon-business-chartResearch & Grants

  • Sustainable Corn/Soybean Production, Ne Soybean Board, October 2017
  • Sustainable Corn/Soybean Production, Ne Corn Board, July 2015

icon-bookmark-starAwards & Honors

  • Fellow, Crop Science Society of America, 2017
  • Agronomic Education and Extension Award , American Society of Agronomy, 2017

Faculty Bio

Arrested ears with a ‘primordial tip’ due to pesticide application + NIS prior to tassel

Corn Ear Development Impacts from Post-emergence Pesticide Applications

June 4, 2020
Corn ear abnormalities have been noted the past few years. Tracing back the information on various field calls often pointed to a misunderstanding of proper growth stages when making post-emergence herbicide applications in addition to pre-tassel fungicide and insecticide applications.

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When estimating whether severely injured plants will survive, check the growing point. Healthy growing point is yellow/white and firm as is shown in this picture. Unhealthy growing point is discolored and soft to the touch.
When estimating whether severely injured plants will survive, check the growing point. Healthy growing point is yellow/white and firm as is shown in this picture. Unhealthy growing point is discolored and soft to the touch.

Replanting Corn: Things To Do and Think About

May 15, 2020
With the recent frost events that occurred the weekend of May 9-10, 2020 in portions of the State, some are questioning the need to replant corn. It’s important to assess potential recovery before making replant decisions.

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soybeans emerging in a field

Soybean Replanting Considerations

May 15, 2020
With the recent cold temperatures and frost in portions of the State, some are questioning the need to replant soybean. It’s important to assess potential recovery before making replant decisions. Soybeans are more resilient than one may think!

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barbel ear and short husk deformations in corn

Planting Date Impact on Corn Growth and Ear Issues

May 14, 2020
Despite the above-average yields in recent years, there has been reports of ear formation issues in corn that ranged from sites in the Texas Panhandle, Colorado, Nebraska, Iowa, and Illinois. Does planting date play a role?

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tractor planting corn in a field

Corn and Soybean Planting Considerations for 2020

April 22, 2020
Everything we do at planting sets the stage for the rest of the year. With tight economics, it’s important to make wise decisions with the factors we can control during planting season.

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Corn and soybean strip plots
Figure 1. Corn and soybean strip plots at South Central Agricultural Laboratory (SCAL) near Clay Center, Nebraska, 2019. Photo by Osler Ortez.

Yield Penalties for continuous Corn and Soybean in the Midwest, US

April 8, 2020
Soybean and corn are the most commonly rotated crops in the Midwest, United States. Rotation benefits are well documented for both crops.

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Cover crop research plots in 2017

Spring-planted Cover Crops for Weed Control in Organic Soybean

March 25, 2020
Weed control in organic soybean usually includes frequent pre-plant tillage operations but spring rains often make it difficult to get into the fields for timely tillage. As a result, weed pressure can be high. Cover crops can help suppress weeds, but after corn harvest it is often too late to establish cover crops. Spring-planting cover crops may be an alternative to fall-planting.

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Corn field with a heavy cloud cover

Corn and Clouds: “…from both sides now…”

November 6, 2019
Solar radiation and temperature data for the third week of August in central Nebraska indicates it likely contributed to the lower-than-expected yields being reported by many growers this year.

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