Roger Elmore - Extension Cropping Systems Agronomist

Roger Elmore

(faculty)
Work Keim Hall (KEIM) 165
Lincoln NE 68583-0915
US
Work 402-472-1451 On-campus 2-1451
Roger Elmore, is an University of Nebraska–Lincoln agronomy and horticulture professor, Heuermann Chair and interim associate department head. Elmore, a Nebraska Extension cropping systems specialist and Water for Food Daugherty Global Institute Faculty Fellow, has spent his entire career addressing agronomic issues relevant to the immediate needs of crop producers. He provides research information that is science-based, timely, and relevant to a diverse audience. Elmore has a long history of applied crop production research and extension programs focused on maintaining or increasing crop production, profitability, and water use efficiency by seeking and demonstrating environmentally sound production practices. His focus is on research and developing, teaching and extending timely and pertinent crop management information for farmers, agribusiness, extension personnel and students. His most significant research contributions have centered on evaluating corn growth and yield response to extreme weather events. He has been able to engage diverse groups based on this research with high-impact extension programming. He co-leads a cover crop research project supported by the Nebraska Soybean Board and the Nebraska Corn Board. He has served as a consultant for various organizations across the globe and he was worked on projects in Ghana, China, Argentina and Puerto Rico. He was employed with the University of Nebraska–Lincoln for 24 years before spending nearly nine years as a corn extension specialist at Iowa State University where he lead development of the “Corn growth and development” extension publication — one of his most important extension contributions to date. He returned to Nebraska in 2014 as a cropping systems agronomist. Having a successful career as a cropping systems agronomist focusing primarily on corn and soybean production, Elmore believes in the synergism of effective teams and has been able to develop and deliver effective state, regional, national and international programs.

icon-academic-capEducation

  • Other, Illinois Valley Community College, 1972
  • BS, Illinois State University, 1974
  • MS, University of Illinois, 1978
  • Ph D, University of Illinois, 1981

icon-business-chartResearch & Grants

  • Sustainable Corn/Soybean Production, Ne Soybean Board, October 2017
  • Sustainable Corn/Soybean Production, Ne Corn Board, July 2015

icon-bookmark-starAwards & Honors

  • Fellow, Crop Science Society of America, 2017
  • Agronomic Education and Extension Award , American Society of Agronomy, 2017

Faculty Bio

Figure 1. Marestail emerging relatively early this year in Nebraska due to plenty of moisture (Photo by Amit Jhala)

Management of Glyphosate-Resistant Marestail in Fall October 25, 2018

For successful marestail management in the fall, apply herbicides after harvest while weather conditions remain favorable (air temperature above 50°F). Effective control now may negate the need for an early spring burndown application.

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Figure 1. Drilling cereal rye into corn stubble in Dodge County, October 19, 2018.
Figure 1. Drilling cereal rye into corn stubble in Dodge County, October 19, 2018. (Photo by Katja Koehler-Cole)

It’s Not Too Late to Plant Cereal Rye as a Nitrogen Catch Crop Before Soybean October 24, 2018

In trials conducted at three research stations in eastern, northeastern and south-central Nebraska, researchers investigated rye productivity and its ability to scavenge N when grown as a cover crop between full-season corn and soybeans.

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Map indicating end-of-season deviations from average corn yields for select sites in the Corn Belt
Map indicating end-of-season deviations from average corn yields for select sites in the Corn Belt

Oct. 16 Corn Yield Forecast - End of Season Report October 19, 2018

The end-of-season corn yield report finds that high temperatures during vegetative stages had little impact on forecasted yield potential. This is the final article in the series looking at simulated crop stages and yield forecasts for 41 locations across the US Corn Belt.

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Corn going down in the field
Figure 1. Rapid corn drydown in corn and increased stalk and ear rots from recent rains could create harvest challenges similar to those faced by growers in 2017. Growers are urged to scout their fields now to determine which should be harvested first to avoid losses. (Photo by Jenny Rees)

Assess Corn Now to Avoid Harvest Complications September 28, 2018

With an unusually warm August and rainy September, corn growers are urged to monitor their fields and prioritize harvest to avoid some of the challenges and losses faced in 2017.

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Corn leaves can turn red when the sugars from the photosynthesis process build up in leaves and stalks when there aren't enough kernels to store the sugar. (Photos by Megan Taylor)
Corn leaves and stalks can take on a red appearance now due to stresses earlier in the season that affected plant photosynthetic processes.

Red Corn Q & A August 24, 2018

Are you seeing red (in your corn)? Corn leaves and stalks can take on a red appearance now due to stresses earlier in the season that affected plant photosynthetic processes. Here's why.

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Map of the Corn Belt showing sites with above-, near-, and below-normal forecasted corn yields for 2018.

Aug. 22 Corn Yield Forecast: Shorter Crop Cycle Did Not Lead to Below-Average Yield August 23, 2018

Corn progress and yield forecasts for 41 sites across the Corn Belt indicate near- or above-average yields for most sites. High temperatures early in the season increased the rate of corn development and led to a shorter crop cycle, but do not appear to have diminished yields.

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Chart of Nebraska corn yields trends from 1971 to 1917.

Soybean and Corn Yield and Acreage Trends August 15, 2018

Nebraska soybean and corn yields have steadily increased from 1971 to 2017 in both irrigated and rainfed production systems. Nebraska irrigated soybean increased at a linear linear rate of 0.68 bu/ac, and irrigated corn increased at a rate of 2.17 bu/ac.

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Corn field
Rainfed corn near Grant, planted about May 27. (Photo by Alexander Tonon Rosa and Italo Kaye Pinho de Faria)

2018 Corn Yield Forecasts: Physiological Maturity Expected Before Historical Averages August 2, 2018

Corn growth simulations across the Corn Belt indicate early corn maturity of one to two weeks for most sites. Simulated corn yields for rainfed and irrigated sites across the region near or above normal at most sites.

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