Mary Drewnoski - Beef Systems Specialist

Mary Drewnoski

faculty
Work Animal Science Complex (ANSC) C220F
Lincoln NE 68583-0908
US
Work 402-472-6289 On campus, dial 2-6289

Faculty Bio

Cattle in pasture
University of Nebraska research has determined that when corn residue is grazed at proper stocking rates, there are small, but positive effects on crop production the following year.

Cattle Compaction in Cropland: Fact or Fiction?

August 23, 2021
Grazing corn residue is a low-cost winter feed for cattle and source of additional income with no negative effects on cropland.

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Harvested corn field
The Crop Residue Exchange is an interactive, online tool that facilitates connections between livestock producers looking for forage and crop producers with available crop residues or other forage resources.

Crop Residue Exchange Links Growers and Grazers

August 23, 2021
The Crop Residue Exchange continues to connect livestock producers with crop residue and other forage resources.

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Eroded field

Does Grazing Cover Crops Negatively Impact Soil and Crop Yields?

April 29, 2021
Grazing cover crops can be a potential option to re-integrate crops with livestock production and reverse the adverse effects of separating crops and livestock production, despite soil compaction concerns. 

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Soil samples

Can Cover Crops Offset the Negative Impacts of Corn Silage?

April 28, 2021
UNL researchers discerned varied results from a study on reducing soil compaction and wind/water erosion on fields harvested for corn silage by planting cover crops. 

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Herz farm cover crop field

Effects and Economics of Grazing Cover Crops in a Three-Year Non-Irrigated Rotation

February 18, 2021
Nebraska Extension reveals findings from long-term crop and livestock system On-Farm Research study.

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crop residue exchange logo

Market Your Crop Residue Using the Crop Residue Exchange

September 24, 2020
This interactive, online tool helps farmers and cattle producers connect and develop mutually beneficial agreements to use crop residue and forage cover crops for grazing.

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Drought stressed soybeans
The importance of estimating soybean yield prior to harvesting as forage is illustrated in this photo of drought-stressed soybean from Washington County, NE. With a closer look at these plants, you can see 10 to 12 pods per stem with 3 seeds per pod on a few of the plants. These soybeans are not stressed enough to consider for hay or silage. Photo courtesy of Aaron Nygren, Nebraska Extension.

Harvesting Soybeans for Hay or Silage

September 1, 2020
The decision to harvest as forage (hay or silage) or grain should be based on economics. However, the decision to not harvest soybeans as grain does need to be made as soon as possible to capture the forage value of drought-stressed soybeans.

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Cattle in a field

Webinar - Cover Crops in Corn Systems: Opportunities for Dual Use - Set for Sept. 15th

August 27, 2020
Can planting cover crops in corn systems provide the dual benefits of improving soil health and be an economical source of forage? This webinar will cover lessons learned on incorporating cover crops after corn silage, high moisture corn, and dry corn harvest in Nebraska.

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