Mary Drewnoski - Beef Systems Specialist

Mary Drewnoski

(faculty)
Work Animal Science Complex (ANSC) C220F
Lincoln NE 68583-0908
US
Work 402-472-6289 On-campus 2-6289

Faculty Bio

Cattle grazing rye cover crop near Tecumseh
Figure 1. Cattle grazing cereal rye cover crop near Tecumseh. Often grazing poses less of a nitrate toxicity risk than haying and feeding.. (Photo by Mary Drewnoski)

Reducing Nitrate Concerns When Grazing Forage Cover Crops July 9, 2018

Nitrate toxicity can be a concern when planting cover crops for forage in hail-damaged crop fields. With proper management of haying and grazing, the risk can be reduced.

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Considerations for Forage Cover Crops after Hail in Corn and Soybean July 9, 2018

If you were hit hard by hail and need to cover your fields, forage cover crops can provide an opportunity for haying or grazing as well as a protective plant layer. Plant selection is a key factor in successfully managing production.

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Windrowing forage wheat in south central Nebraska for processing into wheatlage. (Photos by Todd Whitney)
Figure 1. Cutting and windrowing forage wheat in south central Nebraska for processing into wheatlage. (Photos by Todd Whitney)

Wheat Forage Options and Considerations May 17, 2018

This spring many Nebraska livestock producers facing low forage supplies may be looking for new sources, such as from wheat. This Nebraska research on harvest timing suggests how to optimize feed value from wheat forage.

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Cereal rye cover crop

Q&A on Grazing Cereal Rye after an Anhydrous Application April 19, 2018

This week a CropWatch reader asked: Can you safely graze cover crop rye this spring after anhydrous has been applied? That depends on several factors, write three extension specialists in agronomy and beef production.

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Economics of Annual and Perennial Forages Webinar Feb. 13 February 4, 2018

With current corn prices and the limited availability of perennial grass, some producers are asking themselves if growing forages on cropland might be the answer to feeding the cow herd. A webinar to address these questions in addition to showing economic examples will be held Tuesday evening, February 13, from 6:00-7:30 p.m. CST.

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Cattle grazing in corn stalks
Figure 1. Studies conducted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln at seven locations found that winter grazing of corn fields does not result in biologically significant compaction or negative impacts on subsequent crop yields. (Photo by Mary Drewnoski)

Studies Show Minimal Soil Compaction With Winter Grazing October 24, 2017

Studies conducted by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln at seven locations found that winter grazing of corn residue did not result in biologically significant compaction or negative impacts on subsequent crop yields. This review of the results includes short- and long-term studies

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Residue Exchange icon

Online Crop Residue Exchange Links Growers and Grazers August 16, 2017

A new interactive online tool, the Crop Residue Exchange, links farmers with fields of crop residue with livestock producers looking for new grazing opportunities.

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Figure 1. Steers grazing a mix of oats, turnips and radishes in mid-December. At this point in Experiment 4 there was still 1.5 ton dry matter per acre and calves grazed until mid-January when the weather ended grazing due to the forage being iced to the ground.
Figure 1. Steers grazing a mix of oats, turnips and radishes in mid-December. At this point in Experiment 4 there was still 1.5 ton dry matter per acre and calves grazed until mid-January when the weather ended grazing due to the forage being iced to the ground.

Value of Oats and Brassicas for Fall Forage December 1, 2016

An overview of five experiments evaluating the use of winter-sensitive, cool-season species planted in mid-August after wheat or early September after corn silage harvest for grazing of fall-weaned calves during November and December.

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