Marty Schmer - USDA Research Agronomist

Figure 1. Based corn stalk residue.
Figure 1. Where moisture is not limited, research shows that removing some corn residue from a field may benefit yield in the following crop. However, if residue is removed for more than three years, research showed longer term impacts to the soil.

Crop Residue Removal: Impacts on Yield December 8, 2017

A review of multiple research studies indicates that where moisture is not limited, residue removal can result in no yield reduction to yield increases for the subsequent crop. However, long-term residue removal has been shown to affect other production factors and it's recommended that even in minimal erosion areas, removing residue does impact other production factors and it's recommended that 2.4 tons/acre of residue be left in the field.

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Figure 1. Corn stalk residue with downed ears, baled and ready to use. (Photo by Jenny Rees)
Figure 1. Corn stalk residue with downed ears baled and ready to use. (Photo by Jenny Rees)

Corn Stover Removal: Nutrient Value of Stover and Impacts on Soil Properties December 7, 2017

Corn residue has a number of uses and thus its value as well as its impact on other systems may need to be estimated when evaluating post-harvest options. This article looks at how to estimate the nutrient value of the residue and potential impacts to the soil from removing the residue, based on Nebraska research.

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Amelioration Strategies after Corn Residue Removal December 7, 2017

The authors review three research studies on how amelioration practices such as adding cover crops and/or manure may offset any effects of removing crop residue.

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