Water and Water-Use Topics Focus of UNL Husker Harvest Days Exhibits

Water and Water-Use Topics Focus of UNL Husker Harvest Days Exhibits

September 4, 2008

 

UNL's Institute of Agriculture and

Illustration of new UNL Water Display at Husker Harvest Days.
Picture yourself at the new water exhibits hosted by UNL's Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at this year's Husker Harvest Days Sept. 9-11 near Grand Island. Visit with experts about irrigation, conservation, groundwater and surface water issues as well as drinking water quality and treatment.
Natural Resources will highlight the latest in water research, education and programming within a framework unlike any other in its 31-year history at the Husker Harvest Days show near Grand Island September 9-11.

"We are very excited to be rolling out a very new look and recommitting ourselves to research and extension excellence at Husker Harvest Days this year," said NU Vice President and IANR Harlan Vice Chancellor John Owens.

Beginning this year, UNL Extension experts and Agricultural Research Division scientists will concentrate their Husker Harvest Days exhibits and presentations into more defined topical areas of current interest and concern to Nebraskans statewide. Exhibits will be in UNL's familiar Husker Red building on the south side of the showground at Lot 321.

 

"Though the 'D' word (drought) may not be on the tip of everyone's tongue to the extent it has been the last five years, water is still very much a defining issue to everyone in the state, as we are by no means fully recovered from drought conditions statewide, and for those reasons, we chose water to begin a new tradition of theme-based focus for our Husker Harvest Days presentations," said UNL Dean of Extension Elbert Dickey.

Among the issues IANR exhibits will address this year are understanding and mitigating the effects of drought, what groundwater is and how it works, drinking water and wastewater treatment, and irrigation and water use monitoring.

Other displays in the IANR building will focus on ongoing research on the benefits of conservation buffer strips, subsurface drip irrigation and UNL water-related research and extension programming that is occurring in each of Nebraska's 49 legislative districts. A central information booth will help answer questions on a variety of extension and research-related topics, provide copies of helpful NebGuides and direct those needing help to extension experts in their local area.

IANR's "Market Journal" television program also returns with new presentations in the Market Journal tent next to the Husker Red exhibit building, where it will present 30-minute discussions on crop and livestock marketing and the 2008 federal farm bill.

Grain marketing programs are on Tuesday, Sept. 9, at 11 a.m. and Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Farm bill programs are Tuesday, Sept. 9, at 1 p.m. and Thursday, Sept. 11, at 11 a.m.

Also on display at Husker Harvest Days will be the new high definition television Market Journal remote production van that supports Market Journal programming.

There will be plenty for potential students and their families to see, as well. They will be able to explore a full range of enrollment options and find information on courses of study through the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, School of Natural Resources and the Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture at Curtis, among others. The very successful Nebraska Leadership Education/Action Development program also will be represented at the show.

"We very much enjoy being a part of Husker Harvest Days and being available to help answer questions while we showcase some of the best in research and extension programming that UNL has to offer," said UNL Husker Harvest Days coordinator Steve Ress. "IANR faculty and staff have been a part of Husker Harvest Days since the very first show in 1978 and we're very proud of that tradition."

IANR show themes will change to reflect areas of concern and focus for the state's producers, agribusinesses and natural resources concerns, probably every year or every other year, Owens said.

IANR News Release