Midsummer Crop Diagnostic Clinics Offered at UNL's ARDC

Midsummer Crop Diagnostic Clinics Offered at UNL's ARDC

CMDC 2011

Consultants and growers attending a session on soybean production at the August 2011 Crop Management Diagnostic Clinic at UNL's Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead.

June 26, 2012

Agribusiness professionals and crop producers can view field trials, crop problems and recommended treatments, and this year's research at the UNL's midsummer Crop Management Diagnostic Clinics July 17-18.

Jenny Rees teaching at a 2011 Crop Management Diagnostic Clinic

Extension Educator Jenny Rees shows how sunlight can illuminate a corn leaf and aid in disease identification during a 2011 Crop Management Diagnostic Clinc session.

The CMDC programs provide for a hands-on, close-up look at crop production problems and opportunities to talk with specialists one-on-one.

The UNL Extension clinics begin each day with 7:30 a.m. registration at the Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead, with sessions starting at 8 a.m. Participants should meet at the August N. Christenson Research and Education Building. Participants can attend one or both of the clinics as subject matter will be different each day.

Keith Glewen, UNL extension educator said, "Benefits of the Crop Management and Diagnostic Clinics include one-on-one attention, on-site plot demonstrations, interaction with other participants, discussions about cutting edge research, and an opportunity to earn continuing education credits through Certified Crop Adviser (CCA) program."

For more information on any of these clinics, see the brochure and registration materials.

July 17 Mid-Summer Clinic

Tuesday sessions are:

  • No plant left behind: the impact of phosphorus placement on early season growth and yield of corn
  • Soybean aphid management in the 21st century,
  • In-field insecticide/herbicide/fungicide interactions,
  • Soil carbon sequestration in corn and soybeans,
  • Row configuration and plant populations for corn and soybeans
  • Crop scene investigation — hands-on plant diagnostics.

Six Certified Crop Adviser credits are pending approval in the areas of crop management, 2.5; pest management, 2; soil and water management, 1; and nutrient management, 0.5.

July 18 Mid-Summer Clinic

Wednesday sessions are:

  • Achieving higher corn yields and the importance of hybrid selection for intensive management systems
  • In-season nitrogen application, using crop canopy sensors
  • Corn breeding and genetics: what "we've" done — where are we going?
  • Optimizing soybean management
  • Using technology to make irrigation scheduling easier
  • Nebraska aquifers: understanding our groundwater resources

Six Certified Crop Adviser credits are pending approval in the areas of crop production, 3; soil and water management, 2; and nutrient management, 1.

Registration

Early registration is recommended to reserve a seat and resource materials. Cost for one clinic is $160 for those registering one week in advance and $210 after. Cost for both clinics is $270 one week in advance and $320 after.

For more information or to register, contact the ARDC CMDC Programs, 1071 County Road G, Ithaca, NE 68033, call (800) 529-8030, fax (402) 624-8010, or e-mail cdunbar2@unl.edu.

Late Season Clinic

A late season Crop Management Diagnostic Clinic will be held at the ARDC on Aug. 30. 

Topics will include: switchgrass for bioenergy, sensing – canopy reflectance and sidedress nitrogen applications, the power of Hybrid Maize – late season validation, how cornstalks can bring value back to Nebraska, corn and soybean disease ID and management, and herbicide resistance, timing, and control recommendations for winter annuals.

Nine Certified Crop Adviser credits are pending approval in the areas of pest management, 3;  crop production, 2.5; soil and water management, 2; and nutrient management, 1.5.

Cost for this one-day clinic is $160 for those registering one week in advance and $210 after.

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