New Late-Season Hail Videos Added to Hail Know

New Late-Season Hail Videos Added to Hail Know August 24, 2018

This week four new videos were added to the Hail Know section in CropWatch to address crop assessment and management options after late-season hail.

Hail Damage Evaluation and Management in Soybeans

Estimating yield losses in soybeans from hail damage is a critical first step for determining the need to replant or to make adjustments on future inputs. As with any hail damage in row crops, it’s critical to wait 7-10 days to allow the crop to respond for proper evaluation. Production loss estimates by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation in soybean can be a combination of remaining plant stand, nodes cut or broken, and defoliation. Beginning maturity and full maturity stage soybeans are evaluated based on the seed count method. Be sure to contact your crop adjuster before making any management decision on a hail-damaged crop. Justin McMechan, University of Nebraska Crop Protection and Cropping System Specialist.

Hail Damage Evaluation and Management in Corn

Production loss estimates in corn from hail damage is a critical first step for determining the need to replant or to make adjustments on future inputs. Regardless of crop development stage, it is critical to wait 7-10 days to allow the crop to respond for proper evaluation. Production loss estimates by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation in corn may include remaining plant stand, defoliation and direct losses from ear damage depending on the stage of development. Additional losses and quality issues can occur with fungal infections so continued scouting of hail damage fields is important. Be sure to contact your crop adjuster before making any management decisions on a hail damaged crop. Justin McMechan, University of Nebraska Crop Protection and Cropping System Specialist.

Weed Management Considerations Following Hail

Production loss estimates in corn from hail damage is a critical first step for determining the need to replant or to make adjustments on future inputs. Regardless of crop development stage, it is critical to wait 7-10 days to allow the crop to respond for proper evaluation. Production loss estimates by the Federal Crop Insurance Corporation in corn may include remaining plant stand, defoliation and direct losses from ear damage depending on the stage of development. Additional losses and quality issues can occur with fungal infections so continued scouting of hail damage fields is important. Be sure to contact your crop adjuster before making any management decisions on a hail damaged crop. Justin McMechan, University of Nebraska Crop Protection and Cropping System Specialist.

Forage-Livestock Options and Cover Crops Following Hail

Selecting a cover crop following a mid-season hail event in corn and soybean can be complicated. Following crop insurance decisions, using cover crops for weed management and excess nitrogen uptake is common. Another consideration is the possibility of producing forage. There are several choices for possible forage options in mid-season, hail-damaged fields. Regardless of the forage cover crop choice, planting date is the most important consideration. Daren Redfearn, Nebraska Extension Forage and Crop Residue Specialist

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See Hail Know for further information on managing your crop after hail.