Field Pea Field Days Scheduled for June at 5 Locations across Nebraska

Figure 1. (left) Field pea variety trial in Perkins, one of five field day sites this year.

Field Pea Field Days Scheduled for June at 5 Locations across Nebraska May 24, 2017

Field Pea Field Days will be held at five sites in the Panhandle and west central Nebraska this June. Several will be conducted in conjunction with Nebraska Winter Wheat Field Days.

At each site participants will be able to view field pea varieties and learn about rotational benefits and agronomic practices to profitably grow field peas and integrate them with existing cropping systems. Depending on the location, field days will also include:

  • Tour of Gavilon’s field pea grain processing facility in Hastings (Webster County Field Day)
  • Plot tours of wheat, cover crops, forage, and grain sorghum research
  • Indoor sessions featuring topics on wheat and field pea production in Nebraska and Kansas

Locations

Directions to the research plots and detailed agenda for each location can be found in the flyers for each site, linked here:

For those interested in attending only wheat or field pea plot tours, check flyers for starting times.

Nebraska Field Pea Field Days are sponsored by the SARE in Nebraska (Sustainable Agriculture and Research Education) and are free. Lunch and refreshments will be served at each location, except Hemingford.

Registration

Pre-registration is requested for the three West Central sites (Webster County, North Platte, and Grant) by June 14. Register online.

Contacts

For more information on the west central field days (June 19-22) call the Perkins County Extension Office at 308-352-4340 or email Strahinja Stepanovic at sstepanovic2@unl.edu.

For more information on the Panhandle field days contact Dipak Santra at dsantra2@unl.edu

Participants at a 2016 Field Pea Field Day
Figure 2. Growers at this 2016 Field Pea Field Day examined various varieties and had an opportunity to talk with agronomists about the attributes of each as well as how they could be integrated into current cropping systems.