Insect Management

western corn rootworm beetle

Considering Non-Bt Traited Corn in 2017? Plan for More Scouting February 8, 2017

If you're considering planting non-Bt corn this year, entomologists urge you to plan for the additional pest management practices (and associated costs) you may need to adopt, given this decision.

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Japanese beetle
Figure 1. Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) (Photo by Jim Kalisch)

Nebraska Extension Pest of the Month: Japanese Beetle February 1, 2017

Insects are a part of our environment. Most are beneficial, not problematic. In fact, only a small percentage — less than one percent of all insects — are considered pests. However, some pests can be very problematic because they are invasive insects that came here from another country and they came here without their natural predators.

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Western Bean Cutworm: Pest Status & IPM Options January 6, 2017

A USDA-NIFA Outreach Webcast
hosted by the Plant Management Network

(34 min 48 sec)

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Western bean cutworm damaging an ear of corn
Western bean cutworm damaging an ear of corn

Nebraska Perspective on Efficacy of Cry1F Bt Corn Against Western Bean Cutworm October 21, 2016

While entomologists in the Eastern Corn Belt this month reported reduced efficacy of the Cry1f Bt protein against western bean cutworm in corn, Nebraska growers have been facing this for several years. While Cry1F products will still help control other pests, growers are advised to scout for WBC and determine whether treatment is necessary.

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Soybean stem borer larva
Soybean stem borer larva

Soybean Stem Borers Feeding in South Central Nebraska August 16, 2016

We are starting to see dead leaves caused by feeding of soybean stem borer larvae in south central Nebraska soybeans. No control measures are appropriate at this time, but monitor your fields and be aware that high populations of soybean stem borers may predispose the field to lodging and make harvest difficult.

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Figure 1. Twospotted spider mites on a leaf and in a web. Often spider mites may be almost imperceptible on a leaf, but before more visible against their silk-like webs. (Photos by Jim Kalisch)
Figure 1. Twospotted spider mites. Almost microscopic in size, the spider mites may be imperceptible on a leaf, but become more visible against its silk-like webs. (Photos by Jim Kalisch)

Managing Spider Mites in Corn and Soybean August 11, 2016

Recommendations for managing spider mites in corn and soybean, including treatment thresholds, insecticides as well as discussions on the potential impact of beneficial insects, diseases, and insecticide applications.

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Spider mite damage to soybean leaves.
Spider mite damage to soybean leaves.

Identifying Spider Mite Damage and the Species Responsible August 10, 2016

Two species of spider mites, the Banks grass mite and the twospotted spider mite, commonly feed on Nebraska corn. Banks grass mites (BGM) feed almost exclusively on grasses, including corn, small grains, and sorghum. Twospotted spider mites (TSM) not only feed on many species of grasses, but also on soybeans, fruit trees, and a variety of vegetables and ornamental plants.

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Adult differential grasshopper
Adult differential grasshopper

Watch For Grasshoppers in Crops August 9, 2016

Growers are reporting grasshoppers in field borders moving into crop fields in parts of Nebraska. Here are the insect treatments to help you determine treatment need.

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