Production Studies

Corn/Soybean Rotation Production Studies

Farm research studies in this section include tillage system studies, residue studies, cover crop studies, and other production studies.

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Tillage System Studies

Objective:  Determine the profitability of a no-till corn and soybean rotation versus a tilled system.
Summary: Growth and seed yield of soybeans was not affected by tillage in 2001. In 2002, tillage resulted in lower grain moisture at harvest and slightly higher test weight for corn. In 2003, tillage resulted in slightly lower soybean seed test weight. Plant stands for corn were higher with tillage in 2004 and grain yield was significantly higher. In 2005, seed yield of soybeans was significantly higher with tillage. Corn yield was signifantly higher with tillage in 2006 (see weather related note in research results). Tillage had no effect on soybeans in 2007. Excellent erosion control has been observed in the no-till treatments.  (Stewart) The no-till treatment yield was higher than the conventional tillage treatment yield in 1993.

Objective:  Evaluate the effect of shredding stalks prior to planting vs. not shredding and its effect on yield and profitability.
Summary:  All four fields tested by Quad County producers in 2004 and 2005 showed no significant yield advantage to shredding vs. not shredding stalks.

Objective:  Determine the profitability of a reduced tilled system versus a conventional tilled soybean system.

Objective:  Determine the profitability of producing soybeans using a conventional versus no-till system.
Summary: There was no significant yield difference between the conventional and no-till treatments in either study.

Objective:  Determine the profitability of a ridge tillage versus conventional tillage soybean production system.
Summary:  There was no consistent yield difference to determine one tillage system over the other.

Objective:  Determine and document the effect of strip tillage on the profitability of irrigated corn after corn crop production.
Summary:  Strip-tillage increased the grain yield of irrigated corn (corn after corn) but did not increase yield in corn after dryland soybeans or corn after dryland corn. 

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Residue Studies

Objective:  Determine the profitability of leaving versus parting existing soybean residue prior to corn planting. NOTE: Soybean residue was removed two weeks prior to corn planting when early preplant herbicide was applied.
Summary: 
(Buller)  Pre-cleaning of rows prior to planting into soybean residue had no effect on the growth and yield of corn in 2004, 2005 or 2006. Pre-cleaning of rows of corn residue prior to planting in 2005 resulted in increased corn yield. 
(Mulliken) Removal of soybean residue prior to corn planting resulted in a significant yield increase in 1998. In 1999 residue removal had no significant effect on growth and grain yield of corn. Grain yield was significantly higher in 2000 where soybean residue was removed prior to planting. Grain moisture was slightly lower where residue was removed. In 2001 removal of soybean residue resulted in increased yield and slightly lower plant population. Removal of residue in 2002 resulted in slightly lower grain test weight.

Objective:  Evaluate the effect of shredding stalks prior to planting vs. not shredding and its effect on yield and profitability.
Summary:  All four fields tested by Quad County producers in 2004 and 2005 showed no significant yield advantage to shredding vs. not shredding stalks.

Objective:  Determine the profitability of removing soybean residue two weeks prior to corn planting (when early preplant herbicide is applied) versus during corn planting.
Summary:  Pre-cleaning of rows prior to planting into soybean residue had no effect on the growth and yield of corn in 2004, 2005 or 2006. Pre-cleaning of rows of corn residue prior to planting in 2005 resulted in increased corn yield.

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Cover Crop Studies

Objective:  Determine the profitability of growing a cover crop in a corn and soybean rotation.
Summary: The use of a cover crop resulted in a reduced grain yield in 2008. This could be due to nitrogen being found in the biomass of the cover crop. In 2004 grain yield was lower where a cover crop was planted the previous fall. 

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Other Production Studies

Objective: Determine the accuracy of using a combine yield monitor vs. weigh wagon vs. certified scale to verify crop yield.
Summary:
Calculated yields (bu/ac) were not significantly different between scale weights and monitor weights; however, grain moisture values averaged 0.6% lower with the yield monitor. For total yields, measurements with the monitor were slightly higher. The absolute error was 2.6% for corn and 2.2% for soybeans. The observed error was 1.4% for corn and -0.6% for soybeans.

Objective:  Determine the profitability of soybean production using a crop consultant versus using standard management practices.
Summary:  There was no significant yield difference between the two management practices.

Objective:  Determine the profitability of a corn and soybean rotation versus continuous corn production.
Summary: The corn following soybeans yielded significantly higher than the continuous corn.

Objective:  Determine the profitability of relay cropping wheat into seed corn residue followed by soybeans versus a conventional corn and soybean rotation.
Summary:  Relay cropping was less profitable than conventional cropping in 2004 due to reduced yields of soybeans planted in wheat and exceptional conventional soybean yield. In 2005, relay cropping was more profitable than conventional cropping.

Objective:  Determine and document the effect of using genetically modified hybrids on the profitability of producing corn following soybeans.
Summary: In 2003, the use of a Bt Hybrid resulted in lower yield and drier grain at harvest. Yield, grain moisture at harvest and test weight were not affected by YieldGard in 2004. In 2005, Roundup Ready Hybrid yielded significantly less than the non-Roundup Ready Isoline.

Objective:  To determine & document the profitability of using APSA 80 Soil Conditioner in the production of corn and soybeans.
Summary:  Yield was not increased by APSA 80; however, grain moisture at harvest was reduced in 2009.

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