Scott Schrage - University Communications

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Figure 1. Nebraska's Joe Louis with a collection of leaves infested by corn-leaf aphids. Louis and his colleagues have found that spraying a corn plant with one of its own defensive compounds might reduce aphid colonization by as much as 30%. (Photo by Craig Chandler, University Communication)
Figure 1. Nebraska's Joe Louis with a collection of leaves infested by corn-leaf aphids. Louis and his colleagues have found that spraying a corn plant with one of its own defensive compounds might reduce aphid colonization by as much as 30%. (Photo by Craig Chandler, University Communication)

Experiments Underscore Overlooked Aspect of Defending Corn from Pest March 4, 2019

Spraying a corn plant with one of its own compounds — 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, or OPDA — can help deter the virus-carrying, pollination-disrupting insect known as the corn-leaf aphid.

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Visual representation of gene sequences
Nebraska's James Schnable has helped sequence nearly the entire genetic catalog of proso millet. The resulting genetic insights could help raise yields of the drought-resistant crop in the Nebraska Panhandle and infertile regions likely to face food shortages in coming decades. (Nature Communications / James Schnable / Scott Schrage)

Sequencing of Proso Millet Genome Could Raise Yields, Expand Production Range March 4, 2019

Researchers have now sequenced and mapped the genome of proso millet – a feat essential to raising yields of the drought-resistant crop in the Nebraska Panhandle and semiarid regions where population booms foreshadow food shortages.

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David Holding and Leandra Marshall analyzing corn
Nebraska's David Holding (right) and Leandra Marshall (left) are developing lines of popcorn featuring higher levels of lysine, an amino acid essential to the diets of humans and some livestock. (Photo by Craig Chandler, University Communication)

Genes to Proteins: Enriching the Nutritional Value of Popcorn, Sorghum February 21, 2019

After years of research a University of Nebraska-Lincoln team led by David Holding has roughly doubled the content of lysine, an essential amino acid, in both popcorn and sorghum. For sorghum it could mean a more complete source of nutrition for many in the developing world.

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Research from Nebraska's Suat Irmak and Meetpal Kukal has analyzed links among growing-season duration, heat accumulation and ag yields across the contiguous United States. (Photo by Craig Chandler, University Communication)

115 Years of Data Reveal Longer Growing Season, Changing Temperature Trends June 29, 2018

The past century of climate change has extended the average U.S. growing season by nearly two weeks but driven annual buildups of yield-stifling heat in the West and Northeast, says new research from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln.

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Changes in crop yield due to shifts in temperature and precipitation from 2968 to 2013
Changes in crop yield due to shifts in temperature and precipitation from 2968 to 2013

University Research Published in Nature Investigates Climate Effects on Ag Yields March 22, 2018

While climate change is often described on a global scale, a new University of Nebraska-Lincoln study indicates changing climate trends in the Great Plains between 1968 and 2013 drove about 25% of the collective fluctuations in corn, soybean, and sorghum yields.

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