Tamra Jackson-Ziems, Extension Plant Pathologist

Tamra Jackson-Ziems

(faculty)
Work PLSH 406
Lincoln NE 68583-0722
US
Work 402-472-2559 On-campus 2-2559
Tamra Jackson-Ziems, Extension Specialist and Associate Professor, joined the faculty of the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) in April 2005 after completing her graduate degrees at the University of Arkansas and University of Illinois-Urbana. Her appointment is split between extension, research, and teaching 80/10/10%, respectively, with statewide responsibility for diseases of corn and grain sorghum. Her extension activities encompass educating clientele about disease identification, prevention, and management. And her research projects encompass a broad range of topics, including bacterial leaf streak, Goss’s bacterial wilt and blight, use of fungicides for disease control, and plant parasitic nematodes of corn. During her time at UNL, she has delivered more than 180 invited presentations in 16 states and is the 2016 recipient of both the Nebraska Cooperative Extension Association’s Award for Outstanding Creative Programming (for an individual) and the Nebraska Ag Business Association’s Education and Research Person of 2016 Award.

icon-academic-capEducation

  • Ph D, University of Illinois-Urbana, 2005
  • MS, University of Arkansas, 2000
  • BS, University of Central Arkansas, 1996

icon-bookmark-starAwards & Honors

  • Outstanding Education and Research Person of 2016, Nebraska Ag Business Association, 2016
  • Outstanding Award For Creative Programming (Individual) for "Bacterial Leaf Streak of Corn", Nebraska Cooperative Extension Association, 2016
  • Dinsdale Family Faculty Award, IANR, 2009
  • Distinguished New Extension Employee Award , UNL Extension, 2009

Faculty Bio
Twitter: @tjcksn
YouTube: Corn Disease Videos at UNL CropWatch
Website: Corn Disease section of CropWatch Plant Disease Management

Southern rust on a corn leaf
Figure 1. Southern rust has been confirmed in corn in eight eastern Nebraska counties and growers are urged to scout from now through August, as weather conditions are quite favorable for its development.

Southern Rust Confirmed in Corn in 8 Eastern Nebraska Counties July 19, 2017

Southern rust has been confirmed in corn in 8 eastern Nebraska counties and growers are urged to scout vigilantly to schedule optimal timing of treatment, if needed. Most systemic fungicides can provide protection of leaves from future infections for 21-28 days.

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common corn smut on an ear

Several Corn Diseases Developing Across Nebraska July 13, 2017

Several diseases, as well as other problems that look like diseases, have been confirmed in corn samples from around the state. These diseases can be difficult to differentiate from each other and from abiotic causes. This story offers photos and brief descriptions to aid your diagnosis before making treatment decisions.

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Bacterial leaf streak lesions of corn

Bacterial Leaf Streak Confirmed on V4 Corn in Nebraska June 15, 2017

Bacterial leaf streak disease has been confirmed on a sample submitted to the UNL Plant and Pest Diagnostic Clinic from Adams County. The corn was at the V4 growth stage and represents the earliest that the disease has been confirmed in a field.

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Corn seedling damage
Figure 1. Seedling with post-emergence damping off (left) next to a healthy seedling.

Recent Cold, Wet Conditions are Favorable for Seedling Diseases in Early Planted Corn May 5, 2017

Recent cold, wet field conditions and fluctuations in soil temperatures have put early planted corn at risk for seedling disease development. Cold soil temperatures and episodes of recent rainfall (and snow) are especially favorable for some of the most common and damaging seedling diseases favored by cold wet conditions.

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Sampling of bacterial leaf streak lesions of corn
Figures 2-4. Bacterial leaf streak lesions may vary in color and length, but will be between veins and often have wavy margins.

Update on Bacterial Leaf Streak of Corn in Nebraska February 23, 2017

Bacterial leaf streak was first confirmed in the US in August 2016 when it was identified in Nebraska corn. It has now been confirmed in 51 Nebraska counties and found in corn fields across the Midwest. This article offers information on current status, identification, and management of the disease. Resistance is not currently available in hybrids and standard management measures of bacterial diseases will help mitigate but not eliminate damage.

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Harvest 2016 — When Corn Yields are Below Expectations October 14, 2016

A review of 2016 growing conditions across Nebraska sheds light on a number of factors that may have contributed to reduced yield in individual fields. An understanding of these factors may be helpful when selecting seed for 2017.

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Figures 1a and b. Growth of fungi feeding on dead/decaying tissue and their black spores on corn husks (a) (and other plant parts) may give it a dark, dusty appearance, especially during harvest. The ear itself is usually unaffected by these fungi (b).
Figures 1a and b. Growth of fungi feeding on dead/decaying tissue and their black spores on corn husks (a) (and other plant parts) may give it a dark, dusty appearance, especially during harvest. The ear itself is usually unaffected by these fungi (b).

What's Causing Black "Dusty" Corn? October 14, 2016

What's that black dust that some growers are reporting at corn harvest? Plant Pathologist Tamra Jackson-Ziems discusses the cause

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Aspergillus ear rot damage in corn
Aspergillus ear rot damage in corn

Ear and Stalk Rot Diseases Becoming More Common in Corn Fields October 13, 2016

Ear rot diseases have been observed and stalk rot diseases are becoming increasingly common. It’s important to scout for stalk rot diseases now to determine which fields are at greatest risk of lodging and should be harvested first. Although it is unknown if ear rot diseases are widespread, it’s also important to scout for ear rot diseases to know how to better handle affected grain at harvest to prevent or minimize impacts on grain quality.

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