Charles Shapiro - Extension Soil Scientist—Crop Nutrition

Charles Shapiro

(faculty)
Work
HAL 57905 866 Rd Concord NE 68728-2828
US
Work 402-584-3803 On-campus 7-3803

Faculty Bio

soybean field

Planting Soybean after Soybean (Part 1): Planting Considerations April 13, 2017

Farmers are increasing their soybean plantings for 2017, which likely means some are shifting to soybeans-after-soybeans. This article looks at what you should be considering at planting time as you consider changing your cropping sequence.

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Center pivot irrigated soybeans
Management in a successful soybean-after-soybean cropping system may require growers to make some slight adjustments in their practices, including irrigation, seed selection, and pest management.

Planting Soybean after Soybean (Part 2): In-Season Management Considerations April 13, 2017

In Part 1 of this article, we look at considerations for planting soybean after soybean. In this article, Part 2, we share considerations for in-season management.

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Figure 1. Liquid fertilizer manifold used on a planter for applying starter fertilizer. (Photo by Charles Shapiro)

Starter Fertilizer: When is it Warranted? April 12, 2017

As you evaluate the cost of inputs, consider this: Only focusing on expenses without subsequent income changes is misleading. The most profitable plan uses the most profitable inputs. Is a starter fertilizer one of those inputs? The authors look at university and grower research under various conditions to see when a starter fertilizer offers economic benefits.

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Well nodulated soybean roots

Making Data-Driven Decisions on Soybean Inoculation April 6, 2017

Farmers, agronomists, and researchers provide three steps to deciding whether to inoculate soybeans this spring.

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Value of manure

Finding Win-Wins for Manure: Maximizing Soil Quality Benefits March 6, 2017

Manure offers crop production wins by providing valuable nutrients and helping build soil organic matter and an active soil microbial community. Soils with organic matter levels on the low end of their typical range can benefit the most from manure applications that do not exceed the crop’s nitrogen requirements. Organic matter also improves soil aggregates which in turn helps increase infiltration of precipitation and irrigation water, improves water-holding capacity of the soil, and reduces runoff and erosion. Soils with these characteristics experience greater drought tolerance.

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Phosphorus yield effect

You Can Postpone Phosphorus, Potassium, and Zinc Fertilizer Applications When…. February 28, 2017

Soil testing and applying only the soil nutrients needed to produce your yield goal can provide a significant savings in fertilizer costs. Nebraska research shows growers can save as much as $52.12/acre for postponing phosphorus, potassium and zinc applications.

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Pie charts showing two manure fertility scenarios
Figure 1. Value of the individual nutrients in surface-applied beef manure for the lower and higher value assumptions made in Table 1.

Finding Win-Win Opportunities for Manure February 27, 2017

Land application of manure can create a win-win scenario for your farm by providing valuable crop nutrients while helping build soil organic matter. Learn more about the benefits of replacing commercial fertilizer with manure and how to get the most value when integrating an application into your soil nutrient plan.

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The Long View of Nitrogen Recommendations from Nebraska Extension January 6, 2017

At the 2017 Crop Production Clinics, the Nebraska Extension Soils Team is presenting a historical overview of how nitrogen recommendations for corn have developed and changed since the 1950s. We are also discussing what may lay ahead for nitrogen management.

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